Category Archives: Math Minute

#65 What’s a smartphones made of?

Everyone seems to have one and my 7th grader is sure he’s the only middle schooler without one!  What is it?  A smartphone!

How can you spend your Math Minutes this week?

 

image taken from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Smartphone_icon.svg

#63: KenKen

Can you KenKen®?

https://www.kenkenpuzzle.com/

Watch this tutorial and/or this tutorial to see how to play.  If you’d rather read the instructions, look below.  When you’re finished, print out the puzzles and try to KenKen®!  Turn in your completed puzzles to your teacher or EY Coordinator.

  • The goal of KenKen® is to fill the whole grid with numbers, making sure no number is repeated in any row or column.
  • If it’s a 3×3 puzzle, you only use the numbers 1-3.  If it’s a 4×4 puzzle, you only use the numbers 1-4.
  • The “cages” are outlined in dark black.  The top left corner of each cage has a “target number” and a math operation (+ – x /).  The numbers you put in the cage have to make the target number.
  • Sometimes a cage is one square in which case, it’s a freebie.

Click here for a 4×4 Puzzle

Click here for a 6×6 Puzzle

 

#62 Aibohphobia

Aibohphobia: the fear of palindromes

What’s there to be afraid of?  Palindromes are so cool!  Whether the phobia is real or made up, palindromes are definitely real and this week we’re going to have some fun with them!

According to palindromlelist.net, a palindrome is a word, phrase, number, or other sequence of symbols or elements, whose meaning may be interpreted the same way in either forward or reverse direction (i.e. mom, wow, racecar, 10501, etc.).

Did you know that any number can be written as the sum of 3 palindromes?  It’s true!  Check out this Numberphile video.  Then, visit Christian Lawson-Perfect’s website  to try it out yourself. A computer works best for this step.  Leave a comment with the number you tried and the 3 palindromes that add up to your number.

#61: Math Contests

Who’s up for a contest?

Each week during the 2018-19 school year, a math contest will be posted on the EY Blog.  There are several ways to access the contests.  1. Your teacher should have a poster in his/her room with a QR code you can scan.  2. You can go to the EY Blog main page and select Math -> 2018-19 Math Contests.  3. Click here!

  • Each contest will be a Google Form that you can take on your school iPad.  Although we have no way of checking, we would like for you to take no more than 20 minutes on each contest.
  • Theses contests were designed for students in grades 5-6, but any student is welcome to participate.
  • If there is more than one submission for any particular student, the score for that contest will not be counted.
  • You MAY use a calculator, but please work by yourself!
  • We will keep a running total of your contest points and award prizes periodically.

Good luck and have fun!

 

#60: Millions, Billions and Trillions

How Much is a Million? by David M Schwartz is one of many picture books I have on my bookshelf.  It’s a great book to help students visualize what a million, billion, and trillion look like.  A Million Dots by Andrew Clements is another one of my favorites.  In the book, you will actually see ONE MILLION dots!  Don’t believe me?  You can count them yourself!  Check to see if you have it in your school library!

I really thought I knew everything there was to know about a million, billion and trillion until I came across this Numberphile video.  If you’re up for a challenge and making your brain stretch a little, then this Math Minute is for YOU!

Directions: 

  1. Print a copy (or have your teacher print you a copy) of this worksheet.
  2. Follow the directions on the worksheet.  When you’re finished, turn in your completed worksheet to the EY Coordinator at your building.
  3. Post a comment below about something new/interesting you learned from the video.

#59: World’s Favorite Cookie

What is your favorite kind of cookie?  Mine is chocolate chip and I especially love my mother-in-law’s recipe that has pudding in the batter.  Yum!

For this week’s Math Minute, you have an opportunity to win a package of cookies for your class.  See the list below for your choice of activities that can get you entered!

  • Watch this video about one of America’s favorite cookies.  Jot down some facts as  you watch the video.  Complete this quiz afterwards.  One response per person.  Duplicate responses will be eliminated.
  • Check out this website listing 15 interesting facts about the “World’s Favorite Cookie”.  Post a comment below with something new and interesting you read.  One comment = 1 Entry for the cookies for your class.  In your comment, include your first name, grade, and school (i.e. Toby, 2, Sunset).
  • Oreo Thins have a diameter of 4.5 centimeters and a thickness of 7.5 millimeters.  Write your answers to the following questions on a sheet of paper with your first and last name, school, grade, and teacher.  Have your teacher put it in the “Pony” to Sunset Hills EY.  One entry per student please.
    •  What is the Circumference (C = pi * diameter) of an Oreo Thin?
    • What is the Area (A = pi * radius squared) of an Oreo Thin?
    • How tall would a stack of 10 Oreo Thins be?

image taken from https://www.pdclipart.org/

 

#58: Math Video A Day

Research has been conducted on the effectiveness of using video in the classroom, and according to one study by Kaltura, video is better than the written word when it comes to information retention, education, and overall experience.

I can vividly remember my 7th grade math teacher showing a video call The Case of the Missing Chick Cows : Adding Positive and Negative IntegersIn the video, the Chick Cows were disappearing all around town and farmers started to blame each other for stealing them, only to find out that at night, the Chick Cows were linking arms and flying away.  Some of the Chick Cows had left wings and others had right wings.  When they linked arms together, they were able to fly away.  Over 30 years have past since I watched that video and I still remember it.  Videos have a way of making information “stick” and we are in a day and age were we have access to a plethora of videos that can help us learn.

For this Math Minute, print off the worksheet, “A Math Minute A Day” and use a QR Code reader to scan the code for each video.  As you watch each video, jot down new and/or interesting information.  What connections can you make?  Which video did you find the most interesting?  Silly?  Entertaining?  Let us know by leaving a comment!

Image taken from: https://www.pdclipart.org/

#57: Polyhedron

Screen Shot 2015-01-05 at 1.20.10 PMAn icosahedron is a polyhedron that has twenty triangular faces.  A stellated icosahedron has each of those faces raised to a triangular pyramid.

Wow!  There’s a lot of big words in that sentence!  Find out more about polyhedrons by visiting this website: http://www.mathsisfun.com/geometry/polyhedron.html

How can you spend your Math Minutes this week?
  • Post a comment and share something new you learned about polyhedrons.  You are not limited to the website listed above.  When posting a comment, use your first name and school (i.e. Tyler, Sunset).  Do not publish your email.
  • Make a Modular Origami Stellated Icosahedron by following these directions: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Modular-Origami-Stellated-Icosahedron  Email a picture of your completed stellated icosahedron to your school’s EY Coordinator.
  • Find instructions for making other polyhedron.  Here is one resource: https://www.korthalsaltes.com/  Email a picture of your completed polyhedron to your school’s EY Coordinator.
  • Post a comment and answer the question:  How is origami related to math?  When posting a comment, use your first name and school (i.e. Tyler, Sunset).  Do not publish your email.
  • Find instructions to make an origami animal using the WWF Together app on your iPad.  Email a picture of your completed origami animal to your school’s EY Coordinator.

Screen Shot 2015-01-05 at 2.23.48 PM

We will post pictures of your origami creations on our Student Showcase Wiki.

 

#56: Math and Animation

In the Numberphile and TED Ed videos linked below, Tony DeRose from Pixar talks about 3D animated characters and the math involved to make them look so smooth.  It turns out there is a TON of math behind some of our favorite animated films, and it starts with some of the math learned in middle school!

How can you spend your Math Minutes this week?
  • Watch the videos linked below and then post a comment sharing something new you learned about math and animation.  When posting a comment, use your first name, grade, and school (i.e. Tyler, 5, Sunset).  Do not publish your email.
  • After watching the videos, click on this link and answer the questions.
  • Create your own animation using an app on your iPad.

Numberphile Video:  http://tinyurl.com/ndvpup7

TED Ed Video:  http://tinyurl.com/onqhkxk

#55: Coordinate Geometry

coordinates

Coordinate Geometry is one of my favorite areas of math.  There’s just something about getting a sheet of order pairs and carefully plotting them on graph paper…connecting the dots to reveal a picture.  If that’s your sort of thing too, check out Option 3 below.  Happy plotting!

How can you spend your Math Minutes this week?
  1. Learn the basics of coordinate geometry by watching this video (you have to scroll down the page a bit).  Read through the text underneath the video too.  Post a comment about something new you learned.  When leaving a comment, type your first name, grade level, and school (i.e. Trevor, 3, Sunset).  Do not type in your email address.
  2. This video gives a musical explanation of the inventor of coordinate plane geometry, Rene Descartes.
  3. Print out (or have your teacher print out) these worksheets.  Plot the ordered pairs on the graph paper and reveal a warm surprise!  Take a picture of your completed drawing and send it to the EY Coordinator at your building.
  4. Hopscotch is a free programming app that utilizes coordinates plane geometry.  The video link below explains some basics of Hopscotch and another way to spend your Math Minutes this week.  NOTE: Due to app updates, the Hopscotch video may not match perfectly with the up-to-date-version of the app.  After watching the video, create your initials/name in Hopscotch.  Take a picture of your completed program and send it to the EY Coordinator at your building.  We would love to post it on our Student Showcase Wiki!

Link to Hopscotch Video Tutorial:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AY57Cmra18&feature=youtu.be

hopscotch