All posts by Katie Sindt

Early Enrichment Spark #52: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Today, we celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Below are 10 facts about Martin Luther King, Jr.

  1. Martin Luther King Jr’s father was the pastor of the Ebeneezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, in the United States of America.
  2. Martin was a gifted student. He was awarded several university degrees.
  3. He decided he wanted to become a minister and delivered his first sermon at his father’s church at the age of 18.
  4. In December 1955, in Montgomery Alabama, Rosa Parks, a black woman, was arrested for failing to give up her bus seat to a white man.
  5. Martin Luther King, Jr. was appointed president of the Montgomery Improvement Association which led the boycott of the Montgomery bus services. (A boycott is where you stop using goods or services to bring about a change.)
  6. The bus boycott lasted 381 days at the end of which the US Supreme Court ruled that segregation was illegal.
  7. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a very brave man who believed in non-violent protest. During the course of his campaign his house was bombed, he was arrested on numerous occasions, and he was stabbed. Finally, he was shot and killed at the age of 39 in Memphis, Tennessee.
  8. Dr King was a very powerful orator (speech maker). His most famous speech, “I Have A Dream”, was delivered to an audience of 250,000 people.
  9. Following Martin Luther King Jr.’s murder, a national day of mourning was declared in the USA.
  10. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, held on the third Monday of January, is now a public holiday in the USA.

Have you heard of Kid President? Click on the video below to watch him tell the story of Martin Luther King, Jr. Then, in the comments, tell us how will you celebrate and honor Dr. King on his special day.

Social Studies Spark #43: Martin Luther King, Jr.

Today, January 18th of 2021, is Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Celebrated on the third Monday in January, Martin Luther King Day is a national holiday that honors the United States’ most famous civil-rights activist.

King was an influential civil rights leader – best known for his work on racial equality and ending racial segregation in the United States. His life and achievements are remembered and celebrated on this day.

Dr. King’s peaceful struggle against racial discrimination came to national attention in 1955, when he led a boycott protesting laws that required blacks and whites to sit in separate sections on buses. In 1956 the Supreme Court declared such laws unconstitutional.

In 1963, King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech before a quarter million people during the peaceful March on Washington, D.C. The next year he became the youngest man, at 35, to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He continued fighting for civil rights and against poverty until an assassin’s bullet ended his life on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.

The Lorraine Motel, in Memphis, Tennessee, where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, is now the National Civil Rights Museum.

Click on the video below to take a virtual tour of this museum. In the comments please state how you can honor Dr. King on this day. What small act of kindness can you share?

 

 

 

Early Enrichment Spark #51: National Cookie Day!

Friday is National Cookie Day!!  This is a great time of year for cookies! I know I can’t stop eating them!

Here’s a quick, but fun, video about the history of the cookie – did you know they were invented by accident? Find out how by clicking below:

Then, who is the most FAMOUS lover of cookies???  Well, Cookie Monster! Who else? To help celebrate National Cookie Day, sing along with the video below!

Finally, I think I have the BEST recipe for chocolate chip cookies. I’ve shared it below.

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients

1 cup Shortening
1 cup Sugar
1/2 cup Brown Sugar
2 eggs
2 tsp. Vanilla
2 cups Flour
1 1/2 tsp Salt
1 tsp Baking Soda
12-oz. pkg. Chocolate Chips

Preparation

Cream shortening, sugars, eggs, and vanilla until light and fluffy. Sift together dry ingredients. Stir into creamed mixture. Blend well. Add chips.
Drop from tsp. 2 inches apart on a greased cookie sheet (or a non-stick baking sheet). Bake in moderate oven (375 degrees) for 8 – 10 minutes.
Makes 6 dozen.

SHARE YOUR FAVORITE COOKIE RECIPE IN THE COMMENTS!

Social Studies Spark #42: Top 7 Famous Firsts in World History

Click on the video above to learn about 7 famous firsts in world history.

Each famous first is briefly highlighted – not much information is given. The idea is to spark an interest in you to know and learn more.

Which of the 7 events do you want to learn more about?

Do your research and share what you learned in a creative way – feel free to utilize iMovie, Keynote, Google Slides, etc.

Share with your EY Coordinator when you’re finished!

 

2020 – 21 Weekly Challenge #14: Paper Tower Challenge

Week of December 7 – 11

For this week’s weekly challenge, you will be building a freestanding structure that is as tall as possible and is made of only paper!

Rules:

  • Use only 20 sheets of paper.
  • No tape, staples, paper clips or glue, but you may cut or rip the paper.
  • Use printer paper only!
  • Once you’ve built your structure as tall as possible with your 20 sheets of paper, measure it – use inches as your unit of measure.

When you are finished with your structure, and you’ve measured it, take a picture of your structure with your iPad.

Submit your picture and your measurement via this Google Form link: https://forms.gle/gcZPMXShSm1wLWur6

 

 

 

Early Enrichment Mini-Spark #49: Heroes

In the last Early Enrichment Mini-Spark, you were shown how to make your own pipe-cleaner superhero. That was fun!!

But, did you know that not all heroes have superpowers and/or wear capes?

Lots of stories have heroes or heroines! Think about this question: What does it take to be a hero?

Think about that question while you go to the link below to watch and listen to a story about Ping.

After watching/listening to the story, answer the following questions in the comments below:

1. Was Ping a hero? Why or why not?

2. What qualities or character traits did he have that could be considered heroic?

3. What qualities or character traits did he have that might not be considered heroic?

And, finally…

4. What does it take to be a hero?

LINK TO THE STORY

 

Social Studies Spark #40: Can You Read Shang?

The Shang Dynasty is the earliest ruling dynasty of China to be established in recorded history, though other dynasties predated it. The Shang ruled from 1600 to 1046 B.C.. They were known for their advances in math, astronomy, artwork and military technology.

People of the Shang Dynasty are believed to have used calendars and developed knowledge of astronomy and math, thanks to inscriptions on tortoise shells that have been unearthed by archaeologists. The Shang calendar was at first lunar-based, but a solar-based one was developed by a man named Wan-Nien, who established a 365-day year through his observations and pinpointed the two solstices. Shang Dynasty artisans created sophisticated bronze works, ceramics and trinkets made from jade.

By 1200 B.C., Shang armies were equipped with horse-drawn chariots. Before that, there is evidence of bronze-tipped spears, halberds (pointed axes) and bows.

The Shang Dynasty came to an end around 1046 B.C. The final king in the Shang lineage, King Di Xin, was considered a cruel leader, leading to calls for the end of his rule. The Zhou army, led by King Wu, marched on the capitol city. Di Xin armed nearly 200,000 slaves to supplement the defending army, but they defected to the Zhou forces. In what is known as the Battle of Muye, many Shang soldiers refused to fight the Zhou, some even joining the other side. Di Xin died when he set fire to his palace. The incoming Zhou dynasty would rule for 800 years, though the Shang Dynasty had left an indelible mark on the timeline of Chinese history.

The Shang were the first Chinese people to invent writing. The Shang people etched characters – pictures – onto bones. Shang writing is known as ‘oracle bone script’. Other ancient scripts, such as Egypt’s hieroglyphics, fell out of use, but oracle bone script developed into the modern characters which Chinese people still use today.

CAN YOU READ SHANG?

Go to this link to test your ability to decipher the Shang language. Once you’ve completed the quiz, make your own drawing of some Shang and modern Chinese writing. Take a pic of your writing and send it to your EY Coordinator!

Social Studies Mini-Spark #39: The Presidential Election Process

How does anyone become President of the United States?

An election for president of the United States happens every four years on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November. The next presidential election will be November 3, 2020.

Watch this video to see the process explained from beginning to end:

The Electoral College is a part of the process. But, what is the Electoral College?

In other U.S. elections, candidates are elected directly by popular vote. But the president and vice president are not elected directly by citizens. Instead, they’re chosen by “electors” through a process called the Electoral College.

The process of using electors comes from the Constitution. It was a compromise between a popular vote by citizens and a vote in Congress.

How many electors are there? How are they distributed among the States?

The Electoral College consists of 538 electors. A majority of 270 electoral votes is required to elect the President. Your State has the same number of electors as it does Members in its Congressional delegation: one for each Member in the House of Representatives plus two Senators.

The District of Columbia is allocated 3 electors and treated like a State for purposes of the Electoral College under the 23rd Amendment of the Constitution. For this reason, in the following discussion, the word “State” also refers to the District of Columbia and “Governor” to the Mayor of the District of Columbia.

Map of Electoral Votes:

Would you want to be the President of the United States? Why or why not?

Answer in the comments section below.

Source: https://www.usa.gov/election#item-212481

 

Early Enrichment Mini-Spark #48: Pipe Cleaner Superheroes!

Source: https://frugalfun4boys.com/pipe-cleaner-superheroes

If you are a superhero fan, you will not want to miss this awesome craft! You will have a blast creating your own jointed and posable superheroes out of very simple materials. Pipe cleaners, straws, beads… You probably have most (if not all) of the supplies on hand!

First, grab your supplies:

  • Pipe cleaners
  • Felt, for capes
  • Straws – we used paper straws, but regular straws are just fine (and much cheaper)
  • Googly eyes
  • Pony beads
  • Wooden beads – we used 3/4 inch diameter beads
  • Tacky Glue
  • Hot glue
  • Scissors
  • Markers – we used Sharpie oil based paint markers. They bleed less on wood than regular Sharpies.

Step 1: Start by drawing hair and superhero masks on the wooden beads.

Step 2: Glue on googly eyes – SO CUTE! Then draw a little mouth.     

Step 3: Grab three pipe cleaners. Twist them together in the middle. I found that three “twists” was enough to hold them securely together. Then adjust them so that they are in the arrangement shown.

Step 4: Slide three pony beads onto BOTH of the bottom two pipe cleaners. This will form the body.

Step 5: Cut a straw into 8 one inch segments. (Or feel free to adjust the size!) We found that we could get 7 segments out of each straw, so you’ll need two straws per superhero, with quite a bit left over.

Step 6: Build each limb by sliding on a straw segment, then a pony bead, then another straw segment.

Step 7: Bend the ends of the pipe cleaners into hands and feet. I found that it helps to wrap some of the excess around the wrist or ankle to make it secure. Then trim off any excess ends.

Step 8: Slide the head onto the final two pipe cleaners. Then trim off the excess.

Step 9: To make the head more secure, attach it with Tacky Glue. Squirt some glue onto the pipe cleaners. Then slide the head on. We had a little bit of glue ooze out at the bottom of the head. Just wipe off the excess with a paper towel.
Step 10: Cut out a cape from felt and use hot glue to attach it to the backs of the arm segments.
In the comments below, share a picture of YOUR Pipe Cleaner Superhero!
**Extra challenge**: Write a story with your Pipe Cleaner Superhero (or heroes) as your main character. Share the story with the EY Coordinator at your building!

Early Enrichment Mini-Spark #47: Moving Mammals!

Mammals are everywhere—from the Arctic ice to the driest of deserts. They live on land, in the open ocean, and underground. With more than 5,400 species, mammals move in all kinds of ways. They walk, hop, gallop, and swing from trees. They swim, dive, glide, and even fly!

Go to this website to check out how bats, bears, dolphins, gazelles, gibbons, and/or kangaroos move and learn some fun facts about each!

In the comments below, write down something you learned!