All posts by Katie Sindt

Early Enrichment #58: Who was Jesse Owens?

February is Black History Month, and it’s also the month for the 2022 Winter Olympics. To combine the two, we’re going to learn today about a great African-American Olympian, Jesse Owens.

Who was Jesse Owens?

Track-and-field athlete Jesse Owens won four gold medals at the 1936 Olympic Games. His achievements were important for himself and for many other people at the time. The Games were held in Berlin, Germany. Nazi leader Adolf Hitler was in power there. Nazi banners draped the sports field. The Nazis believed white athletes were best. But Owens proved that they were wrong.

James Cleveland Owens was born in Oakville, Alabama, on September 12, 1913. His family later moved to Cleveland, Ohio, in search of better opportunities.

Jesse became a track star at a young age. In 1928 he set track records in the high jump and the running broad jump (long jump). In 1933, while he was in high school, he broke three other records. He then went to Ohio State University.

In the Olympics Owens won gold medals for the running broad jump, the 100- and 200-meter races, and the 4 × 100-meter team relay. He also set new Olympic and world records.

Owens graduated from college in 1937 and worked for the Illinois Athletic Commission. He later got involved in guidance activities for young boys. He also made goodwill visits to countries in Asia for the U.S. government. Owens died in Phoenix, Arizona, on March 31, 1980.

To learn more about Jesse Owens, watch the video below.

What is the most important thing you learned about Jesse Owens? Comment below.

 

 

Social Studies Spark #48: African-American Athletes in the Winter Olympics!

Source: https://news.yahoo.com/7-notable-black-athletes-made-184117774.html

February marks the beginning of Black History Month, and it is also the month when the Winter Olympics of 2022 kick off! This post honors both of those events.

There have been some big moments for Black athletes in the Winter games. Of course, the Winter Olympics is not historically known for its racial diversity, but that hasn’t stopped a few superstars of color from making their mark, like figure skater Debi Thomas, who became Team USA’S first Black athlete to win an Olympic medal! It was in 1988 in Calgary that she took home the bronze.

And it wasn’t until 2002, just 20 years ago, that Vonetta Flowers became the first Black athlete from any country to win gold in the Winter Olympics. She was a Team USA bobsledder at the Salt Lake City games.

In Beijing, keep an eye out for Erin Jackson, who is back at the Olympics after becoming the first Black woman to qualify for the US Olympic Long Speed Skating Team four years ago.

And one of my personal favorites, the Jamaican four-man bobsled team, they’re back at Beijing– this time around, their first Winter Olympics in more than 20 years. And if folks recall, “Cool Runnings” may have an opportunity for a comeback.

As you watch the Olympics this month, who do you think is an outstanding athlete of color?

Comment below!

Early Enrichment #57: Halloween Candy Sorting!

Halloween only comes once a year.  It is sad, except that you probably have a lot of candy at home to cheer you up for a few weeks!

My son and I like to sort our Halloween candy in different ways!

You could sort them by size:

Or, by wrapper color!

If you want to try sorting your candy these ways, click here for the labels!

Or, try sorting by type of candy and fill in a graph like this!

How did you sort your candy? Comment below!

Social Studies Spark #47: A 2,500-year-old shipwreck!

In 2017, researchers off the Bulgarian coast discovered the oldest intact shipwreck ever found! This ancient Greek vessel was not only nearly 2,500 years old, but was just one of 65 shipwrecks found at the bottom of the Black Sea in remarkable condition. So, why does the Black Sea contain so many well-preserved shipwrecks? Helen Farr and Jon Adams dive into the depths of the unique body of water.

Click below to watch the video!

Once you’ve watched the video, click here to take a quiz!

Feel free to comment with your score below!

Social Studies Spark #46: A Raindrop’s Journey

You may think every drop of rain falling from the sky, or each glass of water you drink, is brand new, but it has always been here, and is a part of the water cycle.  At its most basic, the water cycle is how water continuously moves from the ground to the atmosphere and back again.  As it moves through this cycle, it changes forms.  Water is the only substance that naturally exists in three states on Earth – solid, liquid, and gas.

Over 96% of total global water is in the ocean, so let’s start there.  Energy from the sun causes water on the surface to evaporate into water vapor – a gas.  This invisible vapor rises into the atmosphere, where the air is colder, and condenses into clouds.  Air currents move these clouds all around the earth.

Water drops form in clouds, and the drops then return to the ocean or land as precipitation, often rainfall.   When it rains, the raindrops fall to the ground, and run off into a lake or river, which flows back into the ocean, where it starts the process again.

Have you ever thought about the journey a raindrop takes?

When you click on the link below, you will see a map of the continental United States.

This website allows for you to click anywhere on the map to drop a raindrop and follow its journey to the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic or the Pacific Oceans! Once you click, you’ll get a bird’s eye view of the path the raindrop takes!

Try it out! Then comment below with something that surprised you!

https://river-runner.samlearner.com/?fbclid=IwAR0W9pISldvvUF9tx6l8RoYLwiz1fITqa1j4aiHTy8htV5bTFIXvkqB45dc

 

Early Enrichment Spark #56: Comedy in Wildlife Photography

Did you know that there are awards for funny photographs of wildlife?

Born from a passion for wildlife, The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards began modestly in 2015 as a photographic competition.

Since then, it has grown into a worldwide competition seen by millions of people every year, and always with wildlife conservation at its heart.

The free competition, open to wildlife photography experts and beginners, celebrates the funniness of our natural world and highlights what we need to do to protect it. From a surprised otter to an angry turtle, Comedy Wildlife’s photographs bring a smile to everyone’s face.

Below is a link to a google slides presentation with some of the finalists for the 2021 Comedy Wildlife Photography awards.

Your job is to write something funny to go along with each photo!

Directions:

Click the link below.                                                                                                                       

Make a copy of the slides.   Now they are yours!                                   

Write something funny on each slide to go along with each picture.                                     

When you are finished, click on the yellow share button.                                                           

Share with the EY teacher at your building!                                                             

Swanson/Sunset: henningsen.jennifer@westside66.net                                         

Westgate/Paddock Rd.: spady.lynn@westside66.net                                                                 

Prairie Lane/Loveland/Westbrook: thompson.megan@westside66.net

Rockbrook/Oakdale/Hillside: sindt.kathleen@westside66.net

Link to Comedy Wildlife Google Slides 

Social Studies Spark #45: Map for Time Travelers

                                                                          Source: IFL Science

The Internet has a new favorite interactive map system!

ORBIS, the Stanford geospatial network model of the Roman world, allows you to check how long it would take you to travel from location to location during Roman times.

It’s customizable too! In the unlikely event that you were transported back to 200 BCE and yet somehow the 4G network traveled back in time with you, thanks to these maps you’d be able to calculate how long it would take you to get from Londinium to Corinthus by ox, or Augusta Treverorum to Alexandria as part of a military march.

As well as time, the map, which is of course based on historical evidence, shows you how much each journey would cost.

“Conventional maps that represent this world as it appears from space signally fail to capture the severe environmental constraints that governed the flows of people, goods and information,” Stanford wrote at the time of the release of the first version of ORBIS. “Cost, rather than distance, is the principal determinant of connectivity.”

We thought we’d have a look at how long it would take us to get from Londinium to Ierusalem, to ask them a few questions about what made them eventually change the I in their name to a J.

We gave the parameters that we would be traveling by donkey (as well as boat where necessary) and during the winter. According to Google, if we floored it and didn’t need things like sleep, we could arrive by car in 52 hours, or a much nicer 6-8 hours by plane. But, we know that that the journey would take a lot longer in Roman times:

“The Fastest journey from Londinium to Ierusalem in January takes 53.5 days, covering 5,433 kilometers [3,375 miles]. Prices in denarii, based on the use of a faster sail ship and a civilian river boat (where applicable), and on these road options:

Per kilogram of wheat (by donkey): 22.74
Per kilogram of wheat (by wagon): 27.45
Per passenger in a carriage: 1897.51″

If you were to select the cheapest route, it would take you 98.4 days to complete a 6,129-kilometer (3,303-mile) journey. However, you would save yourself nearly 1,000 denarii per passenger, and 7 denarii per kilogram of wheat. And is it really a holiday if you aren’t shipping a wagonload of wheat back with you as a souvenir?

Check out the map for yourself, it’s pretty cool to play with!

In the comments below, let us know what you discovered!

Early Enrichment Spark #54: Poetry!

Pictured above is one of my favorite poets – Amanda Gorman. In the picture, she is reading a poem at the inauguration of President Joe Biden! And, she is just 22 years old!!

Amanda Gorman is the youngest inaugural poet in U.S. history, as well as an award-winning writer! She has written for the New York Times and has three books forthcoming with Penguin Random House.

Born and raised in Los Angeles, she began writing at only a few years of age. Now her words have won her invitations to the Obama White House and to perform for Lin-Manuel Miranda, Al Gore, Secretary Hillary Clinton, Malala Yousafzai, and others.

In 2017, Amanda Gorman was appointed the first-ever National Youth Poet Laureate by Urban Word – a program that supports Youth Poets Laureate in more than 60 cities, regions and states nationally. She is the recipient of the Poets & Writers Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award, and is the youngest. board member of 826 National, the largest youth writing network in the United States.

Click on the link below to watch Amanda Gorman read her poem “Talking Gets Us There”.

https://pbskids.org/video/dots-spot/3050991492

HERE’S YOUR CHALLENGE: WRITE A POEM OF YOUR OWN!!

Go to https://www.poetry4kids.com/ to explore! Click on the “Poems” tab to read poems others have written to help you gain some inspiration!

Under the “Lessons” tab, you’ll find poetry lessons, as well as a rhyming dictionary!!

Submit your poem in the comments below.

Social Studies Spark #44: The Breathtaking Courage of Harriet Tubman

Image from biography.com

February is Black History Month. I can think of almost no one more heroic in Black history than Harriet Tubman.  The more you discover about Tubman, the more you realize she had to be a superhero to pull off exploits it would be an understatement to say were daring.

This tiny woman who could neither read nor write now has not one, but two national parks dedicated to her story, plus the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center on the eastern shore of Maryland, where she was born Araminta Ross – Minty for short – around 1822.

Her parents were enslaved on different plantations, hours apart. She and her mother were owned by Edward Brodess, who made $60 a year renting her out, starting when she was six.

In 1849, she escaped from a place called Poplar Neck, in Caroline County, Maryland, when word reached her that she was going to be sold South.

Look at a map, and imagine Harriet, in her 20s, running away, alone, on foot. She managed, with the help of the Underground Railroad, to make it a hundred miles to the Pennsylvania border, and freedom.

But then Tubman went back – 13 times over 10 years – leading more than 70 people to freedom.

Click on the link below to watch this TEDED on the life of Harriet Tubman.

https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-courage-of-harriet-tubman-janell-hobson

Early Enrichment Spark #52: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Today, we celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Below are 10 facts about Martin Luther King, Jr.

  1. Martin Luther King Jr’s father was the pastor of the Ebeneezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, in the United States of America.
  2. Martin was a gifted student. He was awarded several university degrees.
  3. He decided he wanted to become a minister and delivered his first sermon at his father’s church at the age of 18.
  4. In December 1955, in Montgomery Alabama, Rosa Parks, a black woman, was arrested for failing to give up her bus seat to a white man.
  5. Martin Luther King, Jr. was appointed president of the Montgomery Improvement Association which led the boycott of the Montgomery bus services. (A boycott is where you stop using goods or services to bring about a change.)
  6. The bus boycott lasted 381 days at the end of which the US Supreme Court ruled that segregation was illegal.
  7. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a very brave man who believed in non-violent protest. During the course of his campaign his house was bombed, he was arrested on numerous occasions, and he was stabbed. Finally, he was shot and killed at the age of 39 in Memphis, Tennessee.
  8. Dr King was a very powerful orator (speech maker). His most famous speech, “I Have A Dream”, was delivered to an audience of 250,000 people.
  9. Following Martin Luther King Jr.’s murder, a national day of mourning was declared in the USA.
  10. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, held on the third Monday of January, is now a public holiday in the USA.

Have you heard of Kid President? Click on the video below to watch him tell the story of Martin Luther King, Jr. Then, in the comments, tell us how will you celebrate and honor Dr. King on his special day.