Category Archives: Math Mini Sparks

#99: Applications of Mathematics

I didn’t know you needed to know math for that!

Find out how math is used in movie graphics, roller coasters, swimsuit design, and so much more!

Spark your math thinking!

  1. Set up your math mini spark recording page: #99: Applications of Mathematics
  2. Explore this website and find a topic that interests you.
  3. In your math notebook, record the topic title and 1-2 interesting things you learned.
  4. Repeat until you have read and recorded information about 10 math topics.
  5.  Share your math mini spark recording page with your teacher/EY coordinator.

#98 Chocolate Math

Chocolate’s flavor is a combination of sweetness, bitterness, and creaminess that many people find irresistible. We celebrate national chocolate day in July every year. Check out this math mini spark to learn more about chocolate and math.

Spark your math thinking!

  1. Set up your math mini spark recording page: #98 Chocolate Math
  2. Read this Bedtime Math post about the world’s largest chocolate kiss!  Try one of the math questions on your recording page before scrolling all of the way down to see the answer.

A Day for Chocolate

3. Check out this math trick that reveals your age and how many times a week you like to eat chocolate at this chocolate math site.

4. Read about chocolate facts at this site. Create a math data page all about chocolate.

Fun Facts About Chocolate

5. Share your math mini spark recording page with your teacher/EY coordinator.

#97 The Mysterious Mobius Strip

Möbius strip, a one-sided surface that can be constructed by affixing the ends of a rectangular strip after first having given one of the ends a one-half twist.

Spark your math thinking!

  1. Set up your math mini spark recording page: #97 The Mysterious Mobius Strip
  2. Watch this introduction video. 
  3. Follow the steps on this site  to make  a Mobius strip.
  4. Take a picture after completing your mobius strip and add it to your recording page.
  5.  On your mini spark page, record interesting ideas from this mini spark.
  6. Share your math mini spark recording page with your teacher/EY coordinator

#96 Different Types of Numbers

Real or Imaginary? Rational or Irrational? In this Mini-Spark, you will learn about different types of numbers and their classifications.
Spark your math thinking!
  1. Set up your math mini spark recording page: #98 Chocolate Math
  2. Start by watching  this video

  3. Choose a worksheet version below to complete.

PDF Version

 Docs Version

4. Share your math mini spark recording page and your worksheet with your teacher/EY coordinator

#95: The Chaos Game

In mathematics, the term chaos game originally referred to a method of creating a fractal, using a polygon and an initial point selected at random inside it.

Spark your math thinking!

  1. Set up your math mini spark recording page: #95: The Chaos Game
  2. Watch this video. Record details on your recording page.

3. Watch this video to learn how to play The Chaos Game. *****This video is long–> looking for other video

Follow the instructions in the video.  Take a screenshot of your final picture and add it to your recording page.

4. Link to the GeoGebra Website to find the chaos game.

4. Share your math mini spark recording page with your teacher/EY coordinator.

# 94: Pixel Power

Pixels are the smallest unit in a digital display. Up to millions of pixels make up an image or video on a device’s screen. Each pixel comprises a subpixel that emits a red, green and blue (RGB) color, which displays at different intensities. In this mini spark, you will learn about the basics of pixels and pixel colors.  

Spark your math thinking!

1. Start by taking out your math notebook or opening your math mini spark doc.  Put the date at the top and put the title of this mini spark. Record all of your work on this page.

2. Use this slideshow of images, which zooms a picture of raft. The final slide shows that the entire photo is actually made from individual squares of color. How does looking at these pictures help explain creation of the digital images that you see? What other images might you see today that are made from pixels?

 

3. Watch these two videos. The first video is a reminder binary numbers. It will help to see this before watching the second video. Take notes as you watch both videos.

4. After watching the second video answer these questions in your notebook. What is the RGB name for turquoise? How does a computer name turquoise? Draw the math steps that were used in the video to explain how a function is used to filter an image.

5.  Share your math mini spark recording page with your teacher/EY coordinator.

Check out the Playing with Pixels badge at the EY website.

#93 Cake Pop Math

Did you hear that Scooter’s Coffee broke the Guinness World Record for the largest cake pop?!  This mini spark will give you the opportunity to learn more, explore spheres, and maybe even make your own cake pops!

 

Spark your math thinking!

  1. Set up your math mini spark recording page: #93 Cake Pop Math
  2. Read the article and leave a comment about something new you learned:  https://www.3newsnow.com/news/local-news/scooters-coffee-breaks-guinness-world-record-for-the-largest-cake-ball
  3. Learn about SPHERES at https://www.splashlearn.com/math-vocabulary/geometry/sphere and think of a creative way to show what you learned.
  4. Look at the website linked below to find the diameter of some of your favorite sports balls.  Calculate the SA and Volume and display your learning in a creative way.  https://www.topendsports.com/resources/equipment/ball-size.htm
  5. Have you ever bought a cake pop?  How much was it and was the cost worth the taste?  Explore the price of cake pops from different stores and make a table comparing the data.  You can find out the cost by visiting a place in-person, or find a website that tells you the information.  Display your data in a creative way.
  6.  Look up a few recipes for cake pops. Which one would you like to try?
  7.  Share your math mini spark recording page with your teacher/EY coordinator.

#92: π Day

Pi is one the most studied numbers in mathematics and on March 14 (or 3/14), we celebrate Pi Day because 3.14 are the first digits of pi.

Spark your math thinking!

  1. Set up your math mini spark recording page: #92: π Day
  2. Learn about 18 ways that NASA uses Pi!  https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/learn/list/oh-the-places-we-go-18-ways-nasa-uses-pi/. Record a few ideas on your recording page.
  3. Learn about other interesting Pi Facts at https://www.piday.org/pi-facts/. Create a info page about what you learned
  4. Find your “Pi Day” using this site. Type in your birthday and record where in pi your date appears.  Do this for a friend or your teacher and record their pi day. I put in my birthdate and the sequence of numbers does not show up until digit 169, 266! 
  5. Choose an interesting way to represent Pi! Check out the ideas at the end of this post.
  6. Share your math mini spark recording page with your teacher/EY coordinator.

Check out the Pi Masters badge at the EY website.

PiSong1

Screen Shot 2016-03-01 at 10.28.23 PM

Pi Grid Art

#91: Mythical Mathematical Mind Reader

This is an interesting game to solve. When you are done, challenge yourself to explain your math thinking.

Spark your math thinking!

1. Set up your math mini spark recording page: #91: Mythical Mathematical Mind Reader

2. Go to The Mind Reader website created by Transum and follow the instructions

         

The Mind Reader

4. Set a timer for 5 minutes. Record all of your math step-by-step on your paper.

5. Look for patterns

6. Brainstorm possible reasons why The Mind Reader is able to predict your symbol every time.

7. At the end of the 5 minutes, write a several sentences about how you think this game works.

8. Share your math mini spark recording page with your teacher/EY coordinator.

lesson adapted from https://www.transum.org/Maths/Investigation/Mind_Reader/ and Yummy math