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Early Enrichment #63 What to do with a box

Listen to this book written by Jane Yolen and Chris Sheban

Your challenge

What can you create with a box?

You can print off a challenge sheet to use or for a bigger challenge take the ABC challenge and use your imagination to turn a box, big or small, into anything at all. If you want to just do this on paper  instead of printing out the recording sheet these are what the two sheets look like.

 

 

 

 

Upcoming Events & Contests

January 8-19:  Qualifying Geography, Science, and History Bee Tests (taken in Science, History/Social Studies Class)

Friday, Feb. 9: Mad Hatter Quiz Bowl at ESU 3

Friday, Feb. 9: Science of Pour Painting and Printmaking

Saturday, February 10:  Marian High School Math Contest (girls only)

Monday, February 12: WMS History Bee (Warrior Time)

Tuesday, February 13: WMS Geography Bee (Warrior Time)

Friday, February 16: WMS Science Bee (Warrior Time)

Friday, February 23:  Virginia Frank Memorial Writing Contest due

Friday, April 19:  Thinking Cap Quiz Bowl Competition

Tuesday, May 7: Extreme Math at ESU 3

Friday, May 10:  Middle School Battle of the Books at ESU 3

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Thursday-Saturday, September 28-30: Code Crush at UNO for 8th Grade Girls Only

Friday, October 6: Mixed Media Grunge Cake Art Seminar with Julie Fjell (12pm – 3pm)

Tuesday, Oct. 10:  Middle School Science Olympiad at Gifford Farm

Week of October 23: Qualifying Spelling Test in ELA Classes

Friday, October 27: NPR Podcast Challenge Workshop

Wednesday, November 1: Deadline for Spooky Saga Creative Writing Contest

Friday, November 17: Thinking Cap Quiz Bowl Competition (9th Period & Warrior Time)

Monday, November 27: WMS Spelling Bee

Thursday, November 30: WE-SIDE Contests due

Friday, December 15: District Spelling Bee at WMS

Friday, December 15: The Stars and Stripes Forever Essay Contest due

 

# 94: Pixel Power

Image result for pixels are.

Pixels are the smallest unit in a digital display. Up to millions of pixels make up an image or video on a device’s screen. Each pixel comprises a subpixel that emits a red, green and blue (RGB) color, which displays at different intensities.
In this mini spark, you will learn about the basics of pixels and pixel colors.  You can extend your learning on this topic by completing the Pixel Power Badge! (coming soon)
Step 1:  Start by taking out your math notebook or opening your math mini spark doc.  Put the date at the top and put the title of this mini spark. Record all of your work on this page.

Step 2. Use this slideshow of images, which zooms a picture of raft. The final slide shows that the entire photo is actually made from individual squares of color. How does looking at these pictures help explain creation of the digital images that you see? What other images might you see today that are made from pixels?
Step 2: Watch these two videos. The first video is a reminder binary numbers. It will help to see this before watching the second video.
Take notes as you watch both vidoes.

After watching the second video answer these questions in your notebook.
What is the RGB name for turquoise?
How does a computer name turquoise?
Draw the math steps that were used in the video to explain how a function is used to filter an image.
Step 3: Turn your notes and responses to your teacher or EY coordinator.

#92: 18 Ways NASA Uses Pi

π Day 2023

Pi is one the most studied numbers in mathematics and on March 14 (or 3/14), we celebrate Pi Day because 3.14 are the first digits of pi.
 Post a comment about something new you learned!

Early Enrichment #60: What Are You Thankful For?

Next week is Thanksgiving! As we get ready, let’s take a look at some fun facts about the holiday:

  • The first Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 over a three-day harvest festival. It included 50 Pilgrims and 90 Wampanoag Indians. It is believed by historians that only five women were present.
  • Turkey wasn’t on the menu at the first Thanksgiving. Venison, duck, goose, oysters, lobster, eel, and fish were likely served, alongside pumpkins and cranberries (but not pumpkin pie or cranberry sauce!).
  • President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a national holiday on October 3rd, 1863. Sarah Joseph Hale, the woman who wrote “Mary Had A Little Lamb”, convinced him to make Thanksgiving a national holiday after writing him letters for 17 years!
  • There are 4 towns in the United States named “Turkey”. They can be found in Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, and Louisiana.
  • The average number of calories consumed on Thanksgiving is 4, 500!
  • The tradition of football on Thanksgiving began in 1876 with a game between Yale and Princeton. The first NFL games were played on Thanksgiving in 1920.

Thanksgiving is a time to be THANKFUL! Watch a video below to see what Kid President is thankful for!

Comment below to let us know what YOU’RE thankful for!!

2022-23 Challenge #3

It’s Fall Y’All and when I think of Fall, I think of FOOTBALL!

For this challenge, you will need to…
  1. Build football goal posts out of materials you have around your house.
  2. Fold a paper football (instructions linked below)
  3. Design an experiment, create a competition, or come up with your own original idea to use what you built.  Your project should include collecting some sort of data and analyzing it.
  4. Share your project with your EY Coordinator.

Paper Folding Football Instructions:  https://www.instructables.com/How-To-Make-A-Paper-Football/

Football Image Source: https://openclipart.org/detail/102853/football

2021-22 EY Challenge #5

Get ready for Computer Science Education (CS Ed) Week!

CS Ed Week is December 6-12 and it is an annual event to inspire students to learn about computer science, advocate for equity, and celebrate the contributions of students, teachers, and partners in the CS field. https://www.csedweek.org/

             If you want to save your progress:

1. Sign in with google @ code. org

2. Go to course catalog on the top left

3. Scroll down and click on hour of code view more choices.

4. Take a screenshot of your certificate when your project is complete.

 

 

Language Arts Mini Spark #66: How to use a the semicolon

It may seem like the semicolon is struggling with an identity crisis. It looks like a comma combined with a period. Maybe that’s why we toss these punctuation marks around like grammatical confetti; we’re confused about how to use them properly. This lesson offers some clarity and best practices for using the semicolon.

  1. Watch the video. Pause the video as needed to record notes. Pay special attention to any words that are new to you, rules, specific examples and sample sentences. These items should all be included in your final note taking page.
  2. Write two sentences of your own and include them on the note taking page.
  3. Share this work with your teacher to earn this mini spark.

Lesson video by Emma Bryce, animation by Karrot Entertainment.