All posts by Jenny Henningsen

#54: Multiplication

Multiplication. It is one of the four types of operations you learned in math (along with addition subtraction and division). There are many different ways to multiply numbers. However, sometimes, multiplying really big numbers can be a challenge. Luckily, there are many different techniques you can use to solve large multiplication problems.

How can you spend your Math Minutes this week?

  1. Watch this video about multiplying using lines. Post a comment about something new you learned.  When leaving a comment, type your first name, grade level, and school (i.e. Trevor, 3, Sunset).  Do not type in your email address.
  2. Print out (or have your teacher print out) this worksheet. Use the method in the video to come up with answers to multiplication problems. You can check your answers on the second page of the worksheet. If you feel comfortable with those problems and want to try multiplying bigger numbers, then print out this worksheet.
  3. Want to learn another math trick? Watch this video for a way to check the answers to your multiplication problems you solved in the worksheets.
  4. Use the app Explain Everything to do the problems. Draw out the pictures and send them to your EY coordinator.

*Lesson inspired by multiplication lessons from East Asian schools

#52: Super Egg

Numberphile is a YouTube channel that posts many videos about many different math concepts. The channel has numerous videos on many real life examples. It is a great channel to learn about concepts not necessarily taught in school. One video that the channel contains is about a super egg, or a superellipse.

How can you spend your Math Minutes this week?

  • Watch the video linked below and then post a comment sharing something new you learned about math, geometry and/or engineering.  When posting a comment, use your first name, grade, and school (i.e. Tyler, 5, Sunset).  Do not publish your email.
  • After watching the videos, click on this link and answer the questions.
  • Share this video with your parents, friends, and/or adults and ask them about real life uses of math

Numberphile Video: http://youtu.be/GznQgTdEdI4

*Lesson inspired by Numberphile video about superellipses

#50: Fibonacci Numbers

1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144

What do these numbers have in common? What pattern do you see? These numbers are a part of what is known as the fibonacci numbers. Fibonacci numbers are found by adding the two previous numbers. So the number after 144 would be 233.

How can you spend your Math Minutes this week?

  • Read about the fibonacci numbers here. Read the about first three sections at least, you can read further on if you want.
  • Get graph paper and make a spiral using a fibonacci sequence, read through the previous link for reference.
  • These numbers can be found in nature. Can you think of other real life examples of fibonacci numbers?
  • Post a comment sharing something new you learned.  When posting a comment, use your first name, grade, and school (i.e. Tyler, 5, Sunset).  Do not publish your email.

*Inspired by a video by Vi Hart

#51: Good Will Hunting Problem

Today’s age is filled with a wide variety of forms of entertainment. Television shows and movies are some of the most common forms today. Usually we don’t associate math with these however there have been some movies and episodes with a focus on a math topic. One such movie is Good Will Hunting. The movie has a particular math problem in which an MIT professor claims it took him years to solve. The problem basically to draw all shapes that fit the description. There are ten shapes in total. MIT is one of the best universities in the world. Are you able to solve the problem that supposedly took an MIT professor a long time to solve in a day or less? Find out!

How can you spend your Math Minutes this week?

  • Watch the video linked below.  The video introduces the problem and explains how to solve it.  Pause around 2:30 so you don’t see the answers until after you attempt the problem.
  • After pausing the video, try drawing all 10 trees. You can check your answers near the end of the video in which he shares the answers
  • Post a comment sharing something new you learned.  When posting a comment, use your first name, grade, and school (i.e. Tyler, 5, Sunset).  Do not publish your email.
  • Share this video with your parents, friends, and/or adults and ask them if they can solve the problem as well

Good Will Hunting Math Problem

*Inspired by the movie Good Will Hunting

#44: Infinity

TO INFINITY AND BEYOND!!!

This famous line from the beloved Disney Toy Story Movies became a common phrase for children in the mid 1990’s.  But what are we really saying when we declare our desire to take off on this infinite voyage?  Check out this TED Ed video on infinity, then click on the link below and challenge yourself to the “Think” and “Dig Deeper” tabs to the right of the video.  Leave a comment here on what you learned or still wonder about “Infinity and Beyond!”

Click here to go to the TED-Ed site for “Think” and “Dig Deeper” challenges                                  *Write your answers to the “Think” quiz on paper and check them here:  Solutions

Knowledge can be infinite!  Check out this link if you just can’t get enough knowledge on this topic!   More on Infinity

Toy Hackers

There will be new episodes and DIY videos every week! Watch now @ https://youtu.be/64O_3lsn4Yw

Try this yourself! Collect the supplies and create! Snap a picture of your speakers and send it to the EY coordinator in your building.

If you liked this project, check out Toy Hackers. Toy Hackers is a new web series for the next generation of inventors! In the first weekly show, Goldie & the gang will help kids turn toy boxes into toolboxes.

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Calling all doodlers!

It’s time to start sketching, because this year’s Doodle 4 Google contest will be open soon.


K-12 students are invited to bring their imagination to life in a doodle of the Google logo, using any medium they choose. The winner’s artwork will be featured on the Google homepage  @ https://doodles.google.com/d4g/

Doodles are the fun, surprising, and sometimes spontaneous changes that are made to the Google logo to celebrate holidays, anniversaries, and the lives of famous artists, pioneers, and scientists.

Check out the contest page to see past winners and to get some ideas! Start working on some sketches.

Check https://doodles.google.com/d4g/ for contest details.

 

 

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Animal Olympians

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Welcome to the Animal Olympics, where species compete daily in the wild to thrive and survive.  Different species have adapted different athletic abilities to succeed in their respective environments, from running fast to chase prey to swimming great distances in search of food and safety. Animals are amazing athletes and their performances in the wild are of often above and beyond Olympic caliber.

And the medals go to………. Animal Olympic Medal Winners

Read through each of the animal award winners, and then choose your own animal to research.  After you have gathered new information about your animal, create an award for your animal similar to those at WWF. Share your project with the EY coordinator in your building.

 

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Stumper of the Week #11

tree-clipart-stock-photos-image

As the trees begin to sprout and bloom, here is a new stumper for you…

Write the word acorn.  Drop the second and last letters.  Add an e.  Add a in the middle.  Double the last letter.  Reverse the first two letters.  Add a after the a, and divide the letters into two words that spell the result of a buried acorn.

Email Ms Skaggs with your answer!  🙂

Bright Ideas Calendar  McDonald Publishing 1991