Category Archives: Reading Enrichment

Language Arts Mini Spark #70 Why is there a “B” in doubt?

Cat- C-A-T     Dog. D-O-G

Not all words have spellings that are as clear and easy to remember as these two. Watch this TED ED video about why there is a “B” in doubt.

 

Record all of the forms of doubt and double from the video. Do research to add more words to your list that were not mentioned.

Make an ABC book with a word for each letter that includes a silent letter.

Read this information page about Latin. Record several important details as you read.

Read more about silent letters at Wonderopolis. Take the Wonder Word Challenge or Test Your Knowledge when you are done reading.

Language Arts Mini Spark #69 ULTIMATE Writing Challenge

When reading a favorite story take some time to notice the length of the sentences you are reading. Writers often use a variety of sentence lengths to create a rhythm.

Using long sentences with lots of details, short and sweet to the point sentences, and combined with mid length sentences will make your story flow.

To complete this mini spark watch this video and complete the 12 sentence story challenge.

Turn your story into your teacher or EY coordinator.

Post adapted from http://briantolentino.com/

Language Arts Mini Spark #68: National Opposite Day

We don’t have to only celebrate opposite day on January 25th. Check out some of these resources to celebrate!

Oh, SpongeBob!

Watch this video and make a list of 10 things you could do today that are the opposite of what you would normally do. Examples: eat breakfast for dinner, greet your friends with “good-bye” instead of “hello”, write your name backwards all day.

 

IRONY

The use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning.

Learn about irony @ TED ed. Discover the three types of irony. Watch all three videos and create a chart with definitions and examples. 

CONTRONYMS

These are words that have contradictory or opposite meanings.

  • CLIP can mean to “cut off” (as in clipping a coupon) or “attach” (as you do with a paperclip)
  • DUST can mean to “to remove particles” or “add fine particles” (as in dusting a cake with sugar)
  • LEFT can mean “remaining” (as in one piece left) or “departed” (as in “she left ten minutes ago.”)
  • SEED can mean ” seeds put in” (as in “seeded with native grasses”) or “to remove seeds” (as in “seeding a watermelon”).

Add the words from above to a list and try to come up with 3 more! Check out more examples here after you have thought of 3 of your own.

Palindromes

 Mom and Dad Are Palindromes, written by Mark Shulman has many examples of word that are written the same forwards and backward. Watch the video, and write down your 5 favorite palindromes from the story.

Lesson ideas are from Big Ideas for little Scholars . 

Language Art Mini Spark #67: Personification

Personification is the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something nonhuman, or the representation of an abstract quality in human form.

1 – Watch this video clip that illustrates the use of personification.


2 – Draw an illustration to match each example of personification. Click on image to open the document to print.

3 – Write a story about a day in the life of an object, using plenty of personification. Include an illustration. You may use the template linked below (click on image).

4 – Submit completed “Day in the Life” story to your EY Coordinator.

Language Arts Mini Spark #66: How to use a the semicolon

It may seem like the semicolon is struggling with an identity crisis. It looks like a comma combined with a period. Maybe that’s why we toss these punctuation marks around like grammatical confetti; we’re confused about how to use them properly. This lesson offers some clarity and best practices for using the semicolon.

  1. Watch the video. Pause the video as needed to record notes. Pay special attention to any words that are new to you, rules, specific examples and sample sentences. These items should all be included in your final note taking page.
  2. Write two sentences of your own and include them on the note taking page.
  3. Share this work with your teacher to earn this mini spark.

Lesson video by Emma Bryce, animation by Karrot Entertainment.

Language Arts Mini Spark #65: Spelling Bee Prep

Let’s get ready for spelling bee season. Watch this video, pause to take notes, and work along with the teacher to practice words that are spelled wrong over and over.
Spend at least 3 minutes taking notes. If you are a spelling PRO, spend more time watching!!

*This is a great word list to use as a practice session!

*Make sure you know how to pronounce all of the words from this list. You can use the internet to help you with this. Type in the word and the word “pronounce” and it will pop up for you.

#1 Start with the first five words.
#2 Whisper spell each one 5 times.
#3 Now practice spelling one word one at a time.
*Look at one word quickly.
*Close your eyes and spell the word using the strategy that works for you.
*Open your eyes and check your spelling from the list.
*Keep practicing until you can spell all 5 correctly.
#4 Repeat with the next 5 on the list.

Try more practice words

Find the list that is right for you
grade 3  grade 4   grade 5   grade 6   grade 7  grade 8
To earn credit for this mini spark, choose 10 words from the grade level that suits you.  Create a study guide. Have a teacher, parent, or peer give you a spelling test over the 10 words you choose. Submit your results and the study guide to your teacher or EY coordinator.
Happy Spelling!

Language Arts Mini Spark #64 Modifiers: What are they? Where do they go?

Modifiers are words, phrases, and clauses that add information about other parts of a sentence—which is usually helpful. But when modifiers aren’t linked clearly enough to the words they’re actually referring to, they can create unintentional ambiguity.

Incorrectly placed modifier: Perched up high on a tree branch, I yelled at the cat to leave the sparrow alone.

Meaning: I don’t tangle with a tabby unless I am perched 10 feet up in the air.

Correctly placed modifier: Seeing a sparrow perched up high on a tree branch, I yelled at the cat to leave him alone.

Meaning: ohhhh….the sparrow is up in the tree. Watch out little sparrow!

#1 Read this teaching page to look over some modifier examples.

#2 Watch this TED Ed video and take detailed notes about modifiers and their placement and navigate the sticky world of misplaced, dangling and squinting modifiers.

#3  Make a visual explaining modifiers with examples of how they are used. Also include your own sentence with a misplaced modifier and then correct the sentence so that the reader understands the meaning.

Challenge:  Do more research about misplaced, dangling and squinting modifiers. Include what you learned in your visual.

Language Arts Mini Spark #63 – All About Axolotls

Do you love Axolotls? Learn more about the amazing Axolotl with this fun mini spark!

Step One: Read the Species Profile and answer these Reflection Questions. Axolotl Reading (Pages 1-2).

Step Two: Research. Find out even more by doing your own research. Use the sheet below as a guide (Description, Habitat, Diet, Lifespan, Conservation).

Step Three: Create! Show us what you learned about Axolotls in a creative way. Choose from one of the following options.

  1. Social Media Post – Using these templates, create Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter posts from the perspective of an Axolotl. Turn in your completed post(s) to your EY Coordinator.
  2. Minecraft Habitat – Design an ideal habitat or underwater playground for the Axolotl using Minecraft. You will need to complete this option at home. Take a photo or screenshot and send to your EY Coordinator.
  3. Regeneration Pic Collage – Did you learn that Axolotls have an incredible ability to regenerate? Watch the video below to learn more! What other Amphibians have this ability? Create a PicCollage that shows us what you discovered.

Language Arts Mini Spark #62 – Simile Me

What is a Simile? The official definition of a simile is a noun that means: “a figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another thing of a different kind, used to make a description more emphatic or vivid.”

Step One: Watch this Brain Pop Jr. video about Similes 

and this word girl video

Step Two: Look at the Simile list below. Whisper read a scenario for each one

Example: as sly as a fox

Hillary was ______________________ , as she to gingerly placed the fruit bat into her backpack.

  • Easy as ABC
  • Like two peas in a pod
  • Straight as an arrow
  • Wise as an owl

Step Three: Watch and listen to the book, “My Dog Is As Smelly As Dirty Socks”. Click book image below.

Step Four: Write a “Simile Me”.

  • First, jot down five words you would use to describe yourself.
  • Use your five words and make comparisons to something else, writing your own version of a “Simile Me”

Here is my example:

1 – busy                                                                                                                                 

2 – creative

3 – hardworking

4 – happy

5 – sleepy

I’m as busy as a timer,

As creative as a stained glass window,

As hardworking as an elephant,

As happy as a well-loved dog,

And as sleepy as a pillow.

Step Five: Use an app of your choice to create a fun illustration/visual of your “Simile Me”

Step Six: Send your “Simile Me” and illustration/visual to your EY Coordinator!

Language Arts Mini Spark #61 – Caption This!

Even if a picture is worth a thousand words, it still needs a caption. Captions are easy to write if you begin with the basics. Let’s practice using the photo below.

Caption:  A caption is text that gives additional information about a picture or illustration.

Example: Begin by brainstorming Who, What, When, Where, and How. Once you have written down these details from the photo, write a caption that gives these details and some additional information (use the checklist below).

Caption Writing Checklist:

  • describe the picture
  • provide additional information
  • written in complete sentences
  • include adjectives and additional details

Now, try one a few on your own!

Teachers: Ask your EY Coordinator for this 65 page resource (PDF), would be great for warms ups and exit tickets to help students practice caption writing!