All posts by lspady

2021-22 EY Challenge # 7

Calling all FUTURE ENGINEERS…It’s EWeek 2022!

Learn about 5 different types of engineers this week, solve the types of problems they solve, and possibly win a prize!  Check back each day this week to find the problems and if you’d like to submit any problems, check with the EY Coordinator at your building. https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/engineers-week

Monday, Feb. 21: Geomatics Engineering

Geomatics engineers collect data and then analyze and interpret it to find solutions  Geomatics engineering plays an important role in construction, transport, communication, mapping and research.

Click here for the problems:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1p3tkRCP3-rBDfzT8hB11_lsWcKmyjFwD/view?usp=sharing

Tuesday, Feb. 22:  Structural Engineering

Structural engineers design and analyze bridges, buildings and even things like concert stages. Environmental factors, what a structure will be used for and what type of weight will be put on it, and how this all might change from day to day before even beginning a design are all things that a structural engineer must consider.

Click here for the problems:  https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-tuesday

Wednesday, Feb. 23:  Systems & Mechanical Engineering

Systems engineers need to ensure individual sub-systems and components of a large project all work together to perform the overall desired function. Mechanical engineering mostly work in HVAC(heating, ventilation and air conditioning).

Click here for the problems: https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-wednesday

Thursday, Feb. 24: Nuclear Engineering

What if you could harness the energy that is released by reactions within atoms?  That’s what nuclear engineering does!  The energy released by reactions within atoms can be used to generate electricity, power transportation systems, and diagnose and treat illnesses.

Click here for the problems:  https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-thursday

#88: EWeek (Engineer’s Week)

Calling all FUTURE ENGINEERS…It’s EWeek 2022!

Learn about 5 different types of engineers this week, solve the types of problems they solve, and possibly win a prize!  Check back each day this week to find the problems and if you’d like to submit any problems, check with the EY Coordinator at your building. https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/engineers-week

Monday, Feb. 21: Geomatics Engineering

Geomatics engineers collect data and then analyze and interpret it to find solutions  Geomatics engineering plays an important role in construction, transport, communication, mapping and research.

Click here for the problems:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1p3tkRCP3-rBDfzT8hB11_lsWcKmyjFwD/view?usp=sharing

Tuesday, Feb. 22: Structural Engineering

Structural engineers design and analyze bridges, buildings and even things like concert stages. Environmental factors, what a structure will be used for and what type of weight will be put on it, and how this all might change from day to day before even beginning a design are all things that a structural engineer must consider.

Click here for the problems: https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-tuesday

Wednesday, Feb. 23: Systems & Mechanical Engineering

Systems engineers need to ensure individual sub-systems and components of a large project all work together to perform the overall desired function. Mechanical engineering mostly work in HVAC(heating, ventilation and air conditioning).

Click here for the problems: https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-wednesday

Thursday, Feb. 24: Nuclear Engineering

What if you could harness the energy that is released by reactions within atoms?  That’s what nuclear engineering does!  The energy released by reactions within atoms can be used to generate electricity, power transportation systems, and diagnose and treat illnesses.

Click here for the problems:  https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-thursday

Code Crush – 8th Grade Girls

CodeCrush is a series of iSTEM immersion experiences for 8th and 9th grade, female-identifying students, designed to show them the innovative world of Information Technology (IT). The program will inspire students to take a deeper look at IT through hands-on experiences with emerging IT fields such as bioinformatics, IT innovation, music technology and cybersecurity.

This experience is all free and will take place from April 21-23.  Part of the experience includes staying overnight on UNO’s campus.

For more information, check out: https://codecrush.unomaha.edu/

Email Dr. Spady at spady dot lynn @westside66.net if you’re interested.

NJHS Application Help Sessions

NJHS Application Help Sessions

Last year the WMS NJHS Faculty Council noted that some students might benefit from instruction on how to fill out an application, specifically how to highlight applicable experiences and how to phrase answers to the question(s) being asked.  We decided to offer some application help sessions this year to see if it would improve the quality of applications.

Here are some details about the help sessions:

  • The help sessions are not mandatory.  Students may attend none, one, or multiple sessions.
  • The first 10-15 minutes of the help session will be spent going over some tips for filling out applications.  For the remainder of the session, students can get one-on-one help with their application and/or just sit and work on completing the application.  Passes will be written for the late bus and/or sports.  Students can also leave early if a ride is picking them up.
  • Sessions will run from 3:20-4:00 in the PAC or during Warrior Time (see below).  Please fill out the Google Form if you plan to attend a session.  Students will be sent a reminder email the day before the session.

Help Session Dates:

  • Thursday, February 10 (during Warrior Time)
  • Tuesday, February 15 (after school)
  • Thursday, February 17 (during Warrior Time)
  • Tuesday, February 22 (after school)
  • Thursday, February 24 (during Warrior Time)

Google Form Link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScsIP_cDMsXzLQjpCfSzfRucN2jNPaTz8G2puXNH5d7QG9JmA/viewform?usp=sf_link

 

Why I Want to Go to College (Writing Contest for 7th-8th Grade)

The Omaha Storm Chasers are proud to once again partner with Nebraska State Treasurer John Murante for the “Why I Want to Go to College” writing sweepstakes.  Entries will be due Thursday, April 4, 2022.

Prizes will be awarded to 12 winners in seventh and eighth grades who will receive contributions to the Nebraska Educational Savings Trust (NEST) college savings accounts – including $2,000 for first place, $1,000 for second place, and $500 for third place. Three winners will be chosen from each of Nebraska’s three Congressional districts, and three winners will be chosen from outside Nebraska.

Each Nebraska winner will receive four tickets to an upcoming Storm Chasers game at Werner Park in Papillion at where they will be recognized during a brief ceremony.

Find out more information at: https://www.milb.com/omaha/community/wiwtgtc.

Language Arts Mini Spark #68: National Opposite Day

We don’t have to only celebrate opposite day on January 25th. Check out some of these resources to celebrate!

Oh, SpongeBob!

Watch this video and make a list of 10 things you could do today that are the opposite of what you would normally do. Examples: eat breakfast for dinner, greet your friends with “good-bye” instead of “hello”, write your name backwards all day.

 

IRONY

The use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning.

Learn about irony @ TED ed. Discover the three types of irony. Watch all three videos and create a chart with definitions and examples. 

CONTRONYMS

These are words that have contradictory or opposite meanings.

  • CLIP can mean to “cut off” (as in clipping a coupon) or “attach” (as you do with a paperclip)
  • DUST can mean to “to remove particles” or “add fine particles” (as in dusting a cake with sugar)
  • LEFT can mean “remaining” (as in one piece left) or “departed” (as in “she left ten minutes ago.”)
  • SEED can mean ” seeds put in” (as in “seeded with native grasses”) or “to remove seeds” (as in “seeding a watermelon”).

Add the words from above to a list and try to come up with 3 more! Check out more examples here after you have thought of 3 of your own.

Palindromes

 Mom and Dad Are Palindromes, written by Mark Shulman has many examples of word that are written the same forwards and backward. Watch the video, and write down your 5 favorite palindromes from the story.

Lesson ideas are from Big Ideas for little Scholars . 

2022 Virginia Frank Memorial Writing Contest Grades 5-8

Website: https://omahalibrary.org/virginia-frank-memorial-writing-contest/

Create your own original fiction featuring a character from a book you read on your own.

Deadline:  Friday, February 25

Check out the website for more details and read the winning entries from last year’s contest.

2021-22 EY Challenge #6 (ACT SOON!)

Calling All Origamists!

Image Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/x1brett/5657827090

Origami by Children (OBC) is an annual exhibition of outstanding origami by children from around the world. It is a wonderful opportunity for young folders to share their work!

Entries are due January 31!  Find out more here: https://origamiusa.org/obc2022-entry-form
Even if you’re not interested in entering the contest, try your origami skills by checking out and completing the Origami Design Badge on the EY Website: https://sites.google.com/westside66.net/eybadgepage/fine-arts-badges