Category Archives: Mini Challenges

#63: KenKen

Can you KenKen®?

https://www.kenkenpuzzle.com/

Watch this tutorial and/or this tutorial to see how to play.  If you’d rather read the instructions, look below.  When you’re finished, print out the puzzles and try to KenKen®!  Turn in your completed puzzles to your teacher or EY Coordinator.

  • The goal of KenKen® is to fill the whole grid with numbers, making sure no number is repeated in any row or column.
  • If it’s a 3×3 puzzle, you only use the numbers 1-3.  If it’s a 4×4 puzzle, you only use the numbers 1-4.
  • The “cages” are outlined in dark black.  The top left corner of each cage has a “target number” and a math operation (+ – x /).  The numbers you put in the cage have to make the target number.
  • Sometimes a cage is one square in which case, it’s a freebie.

Click here for a 4×4 Puzzle

Click here for a 6×6 Puzzle

 

Spiders and Webs

Spiders are master builders, and the webs built by these tiny creatures can be used as a source of inspiration                                      for scientists.

 

Start by reading this article at the Nonfiction minute. Record 5 details as you read.   Article Link 

Now learn more about the strength of the spider silk by reading this article from  Ask an Entomologist. Record 5 details as you read.  Article link

This webpage discusses how a business,Kraig Biocraft Laboratories,  is setting its goals on genetically engineering a super strong fiber.Record 5 interesting details as you read. Webpage Link

Create an illustration, poster or infographic showing what you have learned. Include one or two products on your visual that would be made better with the technology you read about.

 

 

 

 

Science Related Art & Writing

Stone Soup is in the process of gathering work for their September issue which will be science themed.  Check out the many types of work you can submit:
  • write up a science fair project or experiment for Stone Soup readers to try
  • write a short essay about any area of science that fascinates you (i.e. comets, dinosaur coloration, the geology of a place near where you live, something about the weather, etc.)

Check out more details here.  All entries are due July 1, 2018.

#38: Duplicator Lab Riddles

This Math Minute is brought to you by Steve Wyborney.  Steve is an award-winning teacher and instructional coach from Oregon.   Check out his blog at http://www.stevewyborney.com/

For this Math Minute, complete the following steps…

Step 1:  Click here to watch the Duplicator Lab Riddle

Step 2:  Answer 1, 2, and/or 3 riddles posed at the end of the video.

Step 3:  Give your answers to the EY Coordinator at your school.

Robot image taken from: https://pixabay.com/en/robot-machine-technology-science-312566/

Engineering Challenge

Are you up for a challenge that can win you lots of fame and money?  If so, don’t continue reading.  This challenge is not for you.  However, if you’re interested in an engineering challenge just for the fun of it, read on!

Step 1:  Watch this video that gives an overview of the engineering challenge.

Step 2:  Draw out different designs/ideas on paper.

Step 3:  Work with 1-2 other people to decide on the best design.

Step 4:  Gather materials (listed below) and build your design.  Test, modify, test again, modify.  Repeat as needed.

  • Large (approx. 18 oz) paper or plastic cups (10)
  • Small (approx. 9 oz) paper or plastic cups (20)
  • Aluminum foil; cut a larger roll into pieces no larger than 10.75 by 12 inch sheets
  • Popsicle sticks (50)
  • Scotch® tape (1 roll)
  • Approx. 12 mm or 1/2 inch diameter wooden or plastic beads (10)
  • 1 liter (or 32 oz) plastic water bottle
  • Tap water
  • Metric ruler
  • Large, shallow plastic tub to catch water if you are doing the project indoors, or an outdoor area where it is OK to spill water.

View designs here: https://www.sciencebuddies.org/fluor-challenge

If you need help gathering materials, check with your classroom teacher or the EY Coordinator at your building.  Make sure to send a picture of your final design to the EY Coordinator at your building so we can post them on our Student Showcase.

Finio, B. (2017, July 28). Follow the Flow. Retrieved October 5, 2017 from https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project-ideas/CE_p025/civil-engineering/water-flow-system

The Fascinating Physics of Everyday Life

image taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:P_physics.svg

Physics is the branch of science concerned with the nature and properties of matter and energy.  Learn more about Physics by checking out the following resources.

Watch the Fascinating Physics of Everyday Life video.  Answer the questions below by posting a comment and/or try some of the “toys” Dr. Czerski mentions in the video.

  • What is the law of conservation of angular momentum?
  • How does something not touching anything (i.e. Hubble Telescope) know where it is?
  • What are two important things to know about science?

Go to the PHYSICS4KIDS website and learn about one of the topics.  Create a presentation about one of the topics.

Check out Physics for Kids Overview on ducksters.com.  Create 10 trivia questions for your classmates to answer.