Category Archives: Learning Opportunities

Language Arts Mini Spark #70 Why is there a “B” in doubt?

Cat- C-A-T     Dog. D-O-G

Not all words have spellings that are as clear and easy to remember as these two. Watch this TED ED video about why there is a “B” in doubt.

 

Record all of the forms of doubt and double from the video. Do research to add more words to your list that were not mentioned.

Make an ABC book with a word for each letter that includes a silent letter.

Read this information page about Latin. Record several important details as you read.

Read more about silent letters at Wonderopolis. Take the Wonder Word Challenge or Test Your Knowledge when you are done reading.

Science Mini Spark #10 Scared of Snakes?

Visit this video and learn more about vipers without having to actually see one in person. 

Choose a project below to create to earn this mini spark. 

* The word “Viper” comes from what term, meaning giving birth to live young? Make a definition page with this word with the definition and five other interesting words from the video.

* What allows the viper’s fangs to be extra long? Research snake fangs and create a pic collage or other visual with your findings. 

* How does the snake’s rattle make noise? Draw a pictures showing this process. 

Share your work with your teacher or your EY coordinator.

 

Language Arts Mini Spark #69 ULTIMATE Writing Challenge

When reading a favorite story take some time to notice the length of the sentences you are reading. Writers often use a variety of sentence lengths to create a rhythm.

Using long sentences with lots of details, short and sweet to the point sentences, and combined with mid length sentences will make your story flow.

To complete this mini spark watch this video and complete the 12 sentence story challenge.

Turn your story into your teacher or EY coordinator.

Post adapted from http://briantolentino.com/

#88: EWeek (Engineer’s Week)

Calling all FUTURE ENGINEERS…It’s EWeek 2022!

Learn about 5 different types of engineers this week, solve the types of problems they solve, and possibly win a prize!  Check back each day this week to find the problems and if you’d like to submit any problems, check with the EY Coordinator at your building. https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/engineers-week

Monday, Feb. 21: Geomatics Engineering

Geomatics engineers collect data and then analyze and interpret it to find solutions  Geomatics engineering plays an important role in construction, transport, communication, mapping and research.

Click here for the problems:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1p3tkRCP3-rBDfzT8hB11_lsWcKmyjFwD/view?usp=sharing

Tuesday, Feb. 22: Structural Engineering

Structural engineers design and analyze bridges, buildings and even things like concert stages. Environmental factors, what a structure will be used for and what type of weight will be put on it, and how this all might change from day to day before even beginning a design are all things that a structural engineer must consider.

Click here for the problems: https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-tuesday

Wednesday, Feb. 23: Systems & Mechanical Engineering

Systems engineers need to ensure individual sub-systems and components of a large project all work together to perform the overall desired function. Mechanical engineering mostly work in HVAC(heating, ventilation and air conditioning).

Click here for the problems: https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-wednesday

Thursday, Feb. 24: Nuclear Engineering

What if you could harness the energy that is released by reactions within atoms?  That’s what nuclear engineering does!  The energy released by reactions within atoms can be used to generate electricity, power transportation systems, and diagnose and treat illnesses.

Click here for the problems:  https://www.mathcounts.org/resources/eweek-problem-day-thursday

Early Enrichment #58: Who was Jesse Owens?

February is Black History Month, and it’s also the month for the 2022 Winter Olympics. To combine the two, we’re going to learn today about a great African-American Olympian, Jesse Owens.

Who was Jesse Owens?

Track-and-field athlete Jesse Owens won four gold medals at the 1936 Olympic Games. His achievements were important for himself and for many other people at the time. The Games were held in Berlin, Germany. Nazi leader Adolf Hitler was in power there. Nazi banners draped the sports field. The Nazis believed white athletes were best. But Owens proved that they were wrong.

James Cleveland Owens was born in Oakville, Alabama, on September 12, 1913. His family later moved to Cleveland, Ohio, in search of better opportunities.

Jesse became a track star at a young age. In 1928 he set track records in the high jump and the running broad jump (long jump). In 1933, while he was in high school, he broke three other records. He then went to Ohio State University.

In the Olympics Owens won gold medals for the running broad jump, the 100- and 200-meter races, and the 4 × 100-meter team relay. He also set new Olympic and world records.

Owens graduated from college in 1937 and worked for the Illinois Athletic Commission. He later got involved in guidance activities for young boys. He also made goodwill visits to countries in Asia for the U.S. government. Owens died in Phoenix, Arizona, on March 31, 1980.

To learn more about Jesse Owens, watch the video below.

What is the most important thing you learned about Jesse Owens? Comment below.

 

 

Social Studies Spark #48: African-American Athletes in the Winter Olympics!

Source: https://news.yahoo.com/7-notable-black-athletes-made-184117774.html

February marks the beginning of Black History Month, and it is also the month when the Winter Olympics of 2022 kick off! This post honors both of those events.

There have been some big moments for Black athletes in the Winter games. Of course, the Winter Olympics is not historically known for its racial diversity, but that hasn’t stopped a few superstars of color from making their mark, like figure skater Debi Thomas, who became Team USA’S first Black athlete to win an Olympic medal! It was in 1988 in Calgary that she took home the bronze.

And it wasn’t until 2002, just 20 years ago, that Vonetta Flowers became the first Black athlete from any country to win gold in the Winter Olympics. She was a Team USA bobsledder at the Salt Lake City games.

In Beijing, keep an eye out for Erin Jackson, who is back at the Olympics after becoming the first Black woman to qualify for the US Olympic Long Speed Skating Team four years ago.

And one of my personal favorites, the Jamaican four-man bobsled team, they’re back at Beijing– this time around, their first Winter Olympics in more than 20 years. And if folks recall, “Cool Runnings” may have an opportunity for a comeback.

As you watch the Olympics this month, who do you think is an outstanding athlete of color?

Comment below!

Language Arts Mini Spark #68: National Opposite Day

We don’t have to only celebrate opposite day on January 25th. Check out some of these resources to celebrate!

Oh, SpongeBob!

Watch this video and make a list of 10 things you could do today that are the opposite of what you would normally do. Examples: eat breakfast for dinner, greet your friends with “good-bye” instead of “hello”, write your name backwards all day.

 

IRONY

The use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning.

Learn about irony @ TED ed. Discover the three types of irony. Watch all three videos and create a chart with definitions and examples. 

CONTRONYMS

These are words that have contradictory or opposite meanings.

  • CLIP can mean to “cut off” (as in clipping a coupon) or “attach” (as you do with a paperclip)
  • DUST can mean to “to remove particles” or “add fine particles” (as in dusting a cake with sugar)
  • LEFT can mean “remaining” (as in one piece left) or “departed” (as in “she left ten minutes ago.”)
  • SEED can mean ” seeds put in” (as in “seeded with native grasses”) or “to remove seeds” (as in “seeding a watermelon”).

Add the words from above to a list and try to come up with 3 more! Check out more examples here after you have thought of 3 of your own.

Palindromes

 Mom and Dad Are Palindromes, written by Mark Shulman has many examples of word that are written the same forwards and backward. Watch the video, and write down your 5 favorite palindromes from the story.

Lesson ideas are from Big Ideas for little Scholars . 

Language Art Mini Spark #67: Personification

Personification is the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something nonhuman, or the representation of an abstract quality in human form.

1 – Watch this video clip that illustrates the use of personification.


2 – Draw an illustration to match each example of personification. Click on image to open the document to print.

3 – Write a story about a day in the life of an object, using plenty of personification. Include an illustration. You may use the template linked below (click on image).

4 – Submit completed “Day in the Life” story to your EY Coordinator.

Math+: Advanced Math Learning Opportunity

Math+ is an advanced math class that will be taught this spring by Jake Moore, a math instructor at Duchesne Academy.  Students in 6th-8th grade are invited to participate in this course which will focus on Logic and Proofs.

Starting on Wednesday, Feb. 2, the course will run for 6 weeks from 5:30-6:30 at St. Thomas More.  The program costs $250 and families can sign up at www.RedwoodPrep.com

For more information, check out the flyer linked below.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dT0HZJ2kfvEQ3Wb1JLLLc9ZdIWfLFEGr/view?usp=sharing

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