Category Archives: Learning Opportunities

Social Studies Enrichment #34: The San Diego Zoo

Do you know where San Diego, California is? It’s waaaaaaay at the bottom of California – check it out on the map below:

San Diego has an incredible zoo, and they have a website full of animals and activities to check out! You can meet and learn about just about any animal!

Visit the San Diego Zoo!

There are cool videos and even live cams of the animals!

This website can even help you earn an EY digital badge!

Check out Save the Animals or Roaring Keynote!

Reading Enrichment #45: Khan Academy Reading Comprehension Practice!

Did you know that Khan Academy just released the first version of reading comprehension practice on Khan Academy? And, it is grouped by grade level:

Khan Academy recommends starting at your grade level and doing 1-2 practice sets per day (or 10 practice sets per week). This should take about 10-20 minutes per day.  If you find it difficult, completely okay to start at an earlier grade level. Likewise, if you find the passages and questions to be easy, feel free to move to higher grade levels. 

Khan Academy also has a grammar section: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/grammar

Khan recommends starting by taking the course challenge a few times to figure out what you know and don’t know.

This is a great way to practice reading comprehension & grammar while you’re learning at home!  Challenge yourselves! Enjoy!

#74 Fibonacci Fun

Fibonacci

The Fibonacci Sequence

1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55…

The Fibonacci Sequence is a simple sequence of numbers that anyone can learn!  This Math Minute has you exploring some Fibonacci Fun.

How can I spend my math minutes?
  • The list above includes the first 10 terms of Fibonacci’s Sequence.  Write out the next 10, 20 (or more) terms by adding the 2 previous numbers (i.e. the next Fibonacci number is 34 + 55 which is 89).  Yes, I’m aware you can just find a website that lists out the Fibonacci numbers so all you have to do is copy them down, but instead of copying them down, practice your basic math skills and DO the math yourself!
  • “Too much of the mathematics we learn in school is not effectively motivated.” ~Mathemagician Arthur Benjamin Watch his TED Video about the Magic of Fibonacci Numbers at https://youtu.be/SjSHVDfXHQ4
  • Watch this Numberphile video about Random Fibonacci Numbers.  Then, try the activity he explains in the video using a coin.  My sons Toby and Trevor and I recorded ourselves doing the activity here: https://youtu.be/51K6TKbUGXk
  • Read about the Fibonacci Sequence at Math is Fun and leave a comment about something new you learned.

Image of Golden Spiral: “Fibonacci” by Sam Felder is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day by creating an “I Have A Dream” mobile

“I Have a Dream” is a public speech that was delivered by American civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in which he called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism in the United States.

To celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. , this post is challenging you to dream as well.

Materials you’ll need:

  • Scissors
  • drawing paper
  • hole punch
  • string
  • hanger
  • tape
  • You will need 5 clouds, either drawn by you or you can print one from this link.

Directions:

  • On each cloud, draw a dream you have for your family, school, community, country, or world.
  • Write a caption under each drawing.
  • On the back of each cloud, write one thing you can do to make your dream a reality.
  • Hole punch the top of your cloud.
  • Tie a string to each cloud.
  • Hang each cloud from your hanger.
  • Cut out and attach with tape two larger clouds to cover each side of the hanger and write I Have A Dream on the front.

Challenge: Figure out a way to make your mobile move!

Either bring your creation to school to show your EY Coordinator, or take a picture of your creation and email to your EY Coordinator.

 

Social Studies Enrichment #33: MLK, Jr. and the passage of the Civil Rights Act

Source: https://www.ducksters.com/history/civil_rights/civil_rights_act_of_1964.php

Many of you know that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a crusader for Civil Rights. He had a dream. In some ways, that dream became a reality through the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Background

The Declaration of Independence declared that “All men are created equal.” However, when the country was first formed this quote didn’t apply to everyone, only to wealthy white landowners. Over time, things did improve. The slaves were set free after the Civil War and both women and non-white people were given the right to vote with the 15th and the 19th amendments.

Despite these changes, however, there were still people who were being denied their basic civil rights. Jim Crow laws in the south allowed for racial segregation, and discrimination based on gender, race, and religion was legal. Throughout the 1950s and early 1960s leaders like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. fought for the civil rights of all people. Events such as the March on Washington, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the Birmingham Campaign brought these issues to the forefront of American politics. A new law was needed to protect the civil rights of all people.

President John F. Kennedy

On June 11, 1963 President John F. Kennedy gave a speech calling for a civil rights law that would give “all Americans the right to be served in facilities that are open to the public” and would offer “greater protection for the right to vote.” President Kennedy began to work with Congress to create a new civil rights bill. However, Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963 and President Lyndon Johnson took over.

Signed into Law

President Johnson also wanted a new civil rights bill to be passed. He made the bill one of his top priorities. After working the bill through the House and the Senate, President Johnson signed the bill into law on July 2, 1964. Martin Luther King, Jr. attended the official signing-in of the law by President Johnson.

Main Points of the Law

The law was divided up into 11 sections called titles.

  • Title I – The voting requirements must be the same for all people.
  • Title II – Outlawed discrimination in all public places such as hotels, restaurants, and theatres.
  • Title III – Access to public facilities could not be denied based on race, religion, or national origin.
  • Title IV – Required that public schools no longer be segregated.
  • Title V – Gave more powers to the Civil Rights Commission.
  • Title VI – Outlawed discrimination by government agencies.
  • Title VII – Outlawed discrimination by employers based on race, gender, religion, or national origin.
  • Title VIII – Required that voter data and registration information be provided to the government.
  • Title IX – Allowed civil rights lawsuits to be moved from local courts to federal courts.
  • Title X – Established the Community Relations Service.
  • Title XI – Miscellaneous.

Voting Rights Act

A year after the Civil Rights Act was signed into law, another law called the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed. This law was meant to insure that the right to vote was not denied any person “on account of race or color.”

Take a quiz to test what you learned about the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Reading Enrichment #44: Learn about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source: https://www.ducksters.com/biography/martin_luther_king_jr.php

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • Occupation: Civil Rights Leader
  • Born: January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, GA
  • Died: April 4, 1968 in Memphis, TN
  • Best known for: Advancing the Civil Rights Movement and his “I Have a Dream” speech

Biography:

Martin Luther King, Jr. was a civil rights activist in the 1950s and 1960s. He led non-violent protests to fight for the rights of all people including African Americans. He hoped that America and the world could become a colorblind society where race would not impact a person’s civil rights. He is considered one of the great orators of modern times, and his speeches still inspire many to this day.

Where did Dr. King grow up?

Martin Luther King, Jr. was born in Atlanta, GA on January 15, 1929. He went to Booker T. Washington High School. He was so smart that he skipped two grades in high school. He started his college education at Morehouse College at the young age of fifteen. After getting his degree in sociology from Morehouse, Martin got a divinity degree from Crozer Seminary and then got his doctor’s degree in theology from Boston University.

Martin’s dad was a preacher which inspired Martin to pursue the ministry. He had a younger brother and an older sister. In 1953 he married Coretta Scott. Later, they would have four children including Yolanda, Martin, Dexter, and Bernice.

How did he get involved in civil rights?

In his first major civil rights action, Martin Luther King, Jr. led the Montgomery Bus Boycott. This started when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. She was arrested and spent the night in jail. As a result, Martin helped to organize a boycott of the public transportation system in Montgomery. The boycott lasted for over a year. It was very tense at times. Martin was arrested and his house was bombed. In the end, however, Martin prevailed and segregation on the Montgomery buses came to an end.

When did Dr. King give his famous “I Have a Dream” speech?

In 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. helped to organize the famous “March on Washington”. Over 250,000 people attended this march in an effort to show the importance of civil rights legislation. Some of the issues the march hoped to accomplish included an end to segregation in public schools, protection from police abuse, and to get laws passed that would prevent discrimination in employment.

It was at this march where Martin gave his “I Have a Dream” speech. This speech has become one of the most famous speeches in history. The March on Washington was a great success. The Civil Rights Act was passed a year later in 1964.

How did he die?

Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, TN. While standing on the balcony of his hotel, he was shot by James Earl Ray.

Interesting Facts about Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • Dr. King was the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a national holiday.
  • At the Atlanta premier of the movie Gone with the Wind, Martin sang with his church choir.
  • There are over 730 streets in the United States named after Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • One of his main influences was Mohandas Gandhi, who taught people to protest in a non-violent manner.
  • He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
  • The name on his original birth certificate is Michael King. This was a mistake, however. He was supposed to be named after his father who was named for Martin Luther, the leader of the Christian reformation movement.
  • He is often referred to by his initials MLK.

Think you’ve got it? Take a quiz to see how much you learned about this great man!

 

#73 Codes

01000011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00100000 01100001 01110010 01100101 00100000 01000011 01101111 01101111 01101100 00100001

in English, Codes are Cool!

Do you have your own secret code that you use with your friends?  Do you like writing notes to people?  Do you like to write in a diary?  Do you like solving puzzles and finding patterns?  If you answered yes to any of these questions, you might want to check out this Math Minute!

  1. Go to https://www.rapidtables.com/convert/number/ascii-to-binary.html and type in a sentence in English.  Then tap the convert button to translate your message to binary.
  2. Learn about the Pigpen cipher (also known as masonic cipher, Freemason’s cipher, Napoleon cipher, and tic-tac-toe cipher) by watching this video: https://youtu.be/s5XRTcLYy40 Then, write a message using what you learned.
  3. Watch this video about the Enigma Machine at Numberphile: https://youtu.be/G2_Q9FoD-oQ Post a comment about something new you learned.
  4. Learn about the Caesar Cipher by watching this video: https://youtu.be/o6TPx1Co_wg Then create a message for someone else to figure out.  Be sure to include the shift number!
  5. Find out how a code was used to catch someone red-handed! https://www.pcmag.com/news/369045/genius-we-caught-google-red-handed-stealing-lyrics-data