Category Archives: Learning Opportunities

#67 Rose Bowl Parade

parade | pəˈrād | noun

a public procession, especially one celebrating a special day or event and including marching bands and floats.

Who doesn’t love a good parade?  People throwing out candy from elaborately decorated floats, listening to marching bands while baton twirlers dance by, watching the line of fancy cars drive by with kings and queens waiving…the list goes on!  Have you ever participated in a parade?  What is something you remember?  When I was in 4th grade, I dressed up as one of the orphans from Annie and walked in my hometown parade.  My little sister was Annie and my older sister was Miss Hannigan.

One of my favorite holiday traditions is watching the Rose Bowl Parade on New Year’s Day.  This year marked the 130th parade in Pasadena, California.

How can you spend your Math Minutes?

  • Read about the Parade here: https://tournamentofroses.com/about/ and post a “number fact” about the parade.  For example:  45.5 Million people watch the parade on television and 700,000 (estimated) watch it live. Source Feel free to post as many facts as you like.
  • Create a Infographic about some of the data you found out about the parade.  Check out Violet’s example.
  • Read about the Design and Manufacturing process for floats.  Leave a comment with something new you learned and/or your idea for a float.

 

image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/karmakazesal/4146346672

Reading Enrichment # 38: The Mystery of the Upside-Down Catfish

Learn about the interesting Upside-Down Catfish by completing the following…

Start by watching a video about them:

https://www.kqed.org/science/1922038/the-mystery-of-the-upside-down-catfish

Show what you learned by choosing three of the prompts to complete.  Post your response as a comment or email your response to the EY coordinator at your building.

  • Using many details, explain why an Upside-Down Catfish swims upside-down.
  • How is this fish camoflaged?
  • What part of the video was most interesting to you and why?
  • What other questions do you have about Upside-Down Catfish?

Take it a step further by conducting research to find another animal that has camoflage.  What part of the animal is camoflaged? How does this help the animal?

Social Studies Enrichment #25: Winter Solstice

What is the Winter Solstice?

According to Dictionary.com the Winter Solstice lasts for just one moment. It occurs exactly when the Earth’s axial tilt is farthest away from the sun. This usually happens around December 21 or 22 in the Northern Hemisphere or June 20 or 21 in the Southern Hemisphere.

If you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, during the solstice the sun will be at its southernmost point in the sky. The higher in latitude you are, the more you’ll notice that the solstice has the shortest day and longest night of the year.

In ancient cultures around the globe, the winter solstice was marked with ceremonies and celebrations. For example, in the days of the Inca Empire the winter solstice was honored with Inti Raymi, or Festival of the Sun. It involved a ceremony in which an Inca priest would “tie” the sun to a column stone in a symbolic effort to keep it from escaping.

Halfway around the world, indigenous people in Finland, Sweden, and Norway participated in the Beiwe Festival. On the winter solstice, worshippers honored the goddess Beiwe by sacrificing white female animals and covering their doorposts with butter for Beiwe to eat on her travels.

Want to learn about how some other cultures celebrate the Winter Solstice? Check out this post from History.com! Click on the picture below to access the article.  When you’re done with the article, comment below with how you’d like to celebrate the Winter Solstice, which occurs this year on December 21st!

#66 Alpha Bravo Charlie

Say what?

A student recently asked me if I knew the NATO alphabet.  I hadn’t heard of it so I told him to send me an email about it and voila…We have our #66 Math Minute Post!

Here are a few ideas on how you can spend your Math Minutes…

CM (Charlie Mike): Means continue mission.  Keep moving forward.  

Thanks Alex from Swanson for this great Math Minute post idea!  I love learning new things!

Social Studies Enrichment #24: Thanksgiving – The Origin of an American Holiday

As a nation, we’re about to celebrate Thanksgiving this week! Ever wonder how Thanksgiving became a national holiday?

In 1789, President George Washington proclaimed Thursday, November 26, 1789, as the first nationwide “Day of Public Thanksgiving”. In the years that followed, however, the holiday often changed days of the week and even months of the year.

In the mid-19th century, author Sarah Josepha Buell Hale began a campaign to make Thanksgiving a national holiday. In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln declared that the final Thursday of November should be set aside by all states – both North and South – as a day of Thanksgiving.

But this year, it’s the second-to-last Thursday in November.  Why did it change?

The last Thursday of November was the standard for about 80 years. In the 1930s, though, store owners began to complain when Novembers with five Thursdays rolled around. They claimed that celebrating Thanksgiving on the last Thursday in November in these months didn’t leave enough time for Christmas shopping.

FInally, on December 26th, 1941, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed a joint resolution of Congress that officially changed Thanksgiving from the last Thursday in November to the 4th Thursday in November.

Above, we mentioned that Sarah Josepha Buell Hale was an author. Just what did she write that you could recite from memory right now?

Click on the film below to find out how Thanksgiving became a national holiday and to find out the answer to that question.

After watching, comment below with the answer and with what you’re most thankful for.

 

 

Create slime-tasic-fun! 

Making slime is a fun way to study science. Print out the Science Guide and the My Slime Recipe Book to use while you are learning about slime science.

 Science Guide

My SLIMEBOOK

 

The SLIMEBOOK  is 2 page document. Print double sided and cut it in half and staple or glue it together to make a 6 page booklet with 3 slime recipes and a short explanation regarding polymer

Ideas for this lesson are adapted from lessons written by Science Mom. You can find more of her lessons at YouTube.

Coding Challenges

The Hour of Code is celebrated the week of Dec 3-9th.

Look over these fun project ideas and write some lines of code to celebrate the Hour of Code any day of  the year. As you are looking at the resources, make sure to check out the coding badges that you can earn.

Scratch Jr

This app is in Self Service. With this app, you can create a game that reviews any of the ideas you have done in science.  When you are done, share your game with your class.

Watch these instructions for how to make some pages in scratch.

Are you working on badges? Link to scratch badge information.

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Cargo Bot

This app is in self service and is a fun way to learn the basics of
coding and it will help you strengthen your problem solving as well.
Here is a tutorial from YouTube that shows you how to play.

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Hour of Code Challenges

These challenges are found online. Go to code.org to sign up with Goggle to get started.

Are you working on badges? Link to Hour of Code badge information.

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Bitsbox

(app development)

This coding resource is accessed online. To get started, kids login at bitsbox.com with his/her Google account. There is a star in the top right hand corner to tap to get started.

Here is a link to a few free coding projects provided by Bitsbox.

Are you working on badges? Link to Bitsbox badge information.

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Swift Playground

This app is in Self Service.

You will sign on using your Google information.

Start with learn to Code 1.

Are you working on badges? Link to Swift Playground badge information.

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Tynker

This app is in Self Service.

Your teacher needs to have an account and he/she will give you a code to sign in.

  • Go to https://www.tynker.com
  • Log in to Tynker with your Google information
  • Enter the class code when prompted
  • Contact the EY coordinator in your building if you need help.

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National STEM/STEAM Day

NATIONAL S.T.E.M./S.T.E.A.M. DAY is celebrated on November 8, but you can create STEM and ART all year long!

Check out a few of these STEM/STEAM related experiments that you can do to celebrate the national day dedicated to Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math.

Secret Agent Ink

Magic Tie-Dyed Milk

Striped Holiday Tower

Slime Monster

 

1. Choose the one that is most interesting to you

2. Collect the materials you need. Contact the EY coordinator in your building via email if you need help with this step.

3. Take pictures from your experiment

4. Create a one paragraph summary about your project

5. Submit your work to your teacher the EY coordinator in your building.

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Completing one of these experiments, taking a few pictures, and a writing a summary of your project will allow for you to earn the DYI Superstar Badge. Check it out on the digital badge page

 

Post adapted from https://projectmc2.mgae.com/#/experiments

 

# 37 Reading Enrichment: Create your own National Day

Did you know that November 3rd

is national sandwich day?

December 7th is national letter writing day,  and January  7th is national bobblehead day.

Click on the red link for each these days and write a few sentence telling us about each

one.

What day do feel deserves to add to the list of national celebrations?

Pickle day? Nope, that won’t work. It’s already observed on November 15.

How about National fuzzy sock day?

 Wear your cozy socks and keep your feet toasty warm all day long!

That won’t work. It’s already a day people celebrate it on December 21st!

What would be a day that you would LOVE to celebrate? Start brainstorming to think of a special day. When you have a list of several choices, do research to find one  that is not already observed.

When you find one that can be your very own, create your own informational apple clip project about your day.

Include this information:

The name of your day and 5-10 facts about your topic.

Why it is important enough to be a national day?

How people can celebrate this day?

Add color and illustrations to your clips.

Share your project with your teacher or the EY coordinator in your building.

 

Early Enrichment #38 Create your own National Day

Did you know that November 3rd

is national sandwich day?

December 7th is national letter writing day,  and January  7th is national bobblehead day.

Click on the red link for each these days and write a few sentence telling us about each

one.

What day do feel deserves to add to the list of national celebrations?

Pickle day? It’s observed on November 15.

How about National fuzzy sock day? It’s a day people celebrate it on December 21st!

What would be a day that you would LOVE to celebrate? Start brainstorming. Create a list of 10 days that you would enjoy having as special days on the calendar.

After you create your list, choose your very favorite day. Create your own informational apple clip project about your day.

Include this information:

The name of your day

3-5 facts about your topic

How we can celebrate this day?

Why it is important enough to be a national day?

Add color and illustrations to your clips.

EXTRA: Do research to find out if your day is already celebrated. If so, add that date to your clip project.

Share your project with your teacher or the EY coordinator in your building.