Category Archives: Learning Opportunities

Social Studies Spark #52: A Virtual Tour of The Acropolis!

What is the Acropolis of Athens, Greece?

Ancient cities were often built around a fortress on top of a hill. When a city spread to the area below, the high part came to be called the acropolis, which means “city at the top” in Greek. The best-known acropolis is in Athens, Greece. It was designated a World Heritage site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 1987.

The buildings of the Athens Acropolis were made mostly of white marble. Parts of some of the buildings, including a temple called the Erechtheum, are still standing today. The Erechtheum had a porch with marble columns in the shape of female figures.

The most famous surviving building is the Parthenon. The Parthenon was built almost 2,500 years ago and was dedicated to the goddess, Athena. Athens was later ruled by Christians who made the Parthenon a church. In the 1400s, Turkish forces took control of the Acropolis and made the Parthenon an Islamic mosque. In 1687, during a war, some gunpowder stored there exploded, destroying the middle of the building.

You can take a virtual field trip to the amazingly historic place! Click the link below to explore parts of all of The Acropolis! Click “Begin” and then note the color coding to click on your chosen spot on the map. Click “go” and have a look around! Make sure to read the descriptions and learn all about this awesome place without actually going there yourself!

https://www.acropolisvirtualtour.gr/

Source: https://kids.britannica.com/kids/article/Acropolis/351394#:~:text=Ancient%20cities%20were%20often%20built,acropolis%20is%20in%20Athens%2C%20Greece.

Ice Ice Baby!

Alright Stop! Collaborate and visit…

These 3 “cool” websites with some awesome ice inventions!

For this STEAM Mini Spark, check out the 3 websites listed below.  Each one has a video and some information to read.

For each website/video, write down:

3 new things you learned
2 things you wonder
1 question you have
  1. Building Frozen Castles with the Master of Ice
  2. The 3-million-year old Ningwu ice cave never thaws
  3. Ice Drumming on Lake Baikal

 

Writing Contest-Due Feb. 24, 2023

This writing contests is simple!  Pick an integer and write a 100 word mini-saga.  That’s it!

INTEGER:

[in-tuh-juh] noun

a number which is not a fraction; a whole number

Could you finish one of these story starters?
  • I rolled a 6…
  • I am number 13…
  • It was 2099…
  • Room 237 was empty…
  • I was down to my last $5…
  • Only 30 seconds left…
  • I was public enemy number 1…
Use one of the story starters above or think of your own!  Hurry!  Entries are Due Feb. 24.  For help in submitting your writing, contact the EY Coordinator at your building.

Click For More Information: https://youngwritersusa.com/contest/middle-high/integer#download-links

 

 

 

#91: Mythical Mathmathetial Mind Reader

Check out this number game to solve and then challenge yourself to explain your math thinking.

  • Grab scratch paper

  • Set timer for 5 min 

  • Go to The Mind Reader website created by Transum and follow the instructions

          The Mind Reader

  • Record all of your math step by step on your paper

  • Look for patterns

  • Brainstorm on possible reasons why The Mind Reader is able to predict your symbol every time.

  • At the end of the 5 minutes, write a several sentences about how you think this game works. 

lesson adapted from https://www.transum.org/Maths/Investigation/Mind_Reader/ and Yummy math

Social Studies Spark #51: Ancient Adventures Creative Writing Project

Which era or person will get your creativity flowing? Watch the video above and get  inspired to write with history!
Take the excitement of history and mix it with your imagination to create ancient adventures!
You can pick any person, place or event from history to inspire your mini-saga, a story told in just 100 words that must have a beginning, a middle & an ending. It MUST be original! You can be inspired by other stories, but your mini-saga must be written in your own words. HERE are some examples of other students’ mini-sagas! Go check them out!
From discovering a pharaoh’s tomb, or a soldier in the trenches, to being a president or an explorer it’s a great way to tie in creative writing with history to have a bit of fun, and to create an original short story.
Use THIS LINK to download a graphic organizer to help you get started!
We can’t wait to read your stories!

Early Enrichment #60: What Are You Thankful For?

Next week is Thanksgiving! As we get ready, let’s take a look at some fun facts about the holiday:

  • The first Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 over a three-day harvest festival. It included 50 Pilgrims and 90 Wampanoag Indians. It is believed by historians that only five women were present.
  • Turkey wasn’t on the menu at the first Thanksgiving. Venison, duck, goose, oysters, lobster, eel, and fish were likely served, alongside pumpkins and cranberries (but not pumpkin pie or cranberry sauce!).
  • President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a national holiday on October 3rd, 1863. Sarah Joseph Hale, the woman who wrote “Mary Had A Little Lamb”, convinced him to make Thanksgiving a national holiday after writing him letters for 17 years!
  • There are 4 towns in the United States named “Turkey”. They can be found in Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, and Louisiana.
  • The average number of calories consumed on Thanksgiving is 4, 500!
  • The tradition of football on Thanksgiving began in 1876 with a game between Yale and Princeton. The first NFL games were played on Thanksgiving in 1920.

Thanksgiving is a time to be THANKFUL! Watch a video below to see what Kid President is thankful for!

Comment below to let us know what YOU’RE thankful for!!

Social Studies Spark #50: All About Thanksgiving!

Next week is Thanksgiving! Did you know that Thanksgiving always falls on a Thursday? Thanksgiving has been an annual holiday in the United States since 1863. However, the First Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621. Here are five things we know about the First Thanksgiving!

1. More than 100 people attended
The Wampanoag Indians who attended the first Thanksgiving had occupied the land for thousands of years and were key to the survival of the colonists during the first year they arrived in 1620, according to the National Museum of the American Indian. After the Pilgrims successfully harvested their first crops in the fall of 1621, at least 140 people gathered to eat and partake in games, historians say. No one knows exactly what prompted the two groups to dine together, but there were at least 90 native men and 50 Englishmen present. They most likely ran races and shot at marks as forms of entertainment, Wall said. The English likely ate off of tables, while the native people dined on the ground.

2. They ate for three days
The festivities went on for three days, according to primary accounts. The nearest village of native Wampanoag people traveled on foot for about two days to attend. It took them so long to get there that it didn’t make sense for them to turn around and go home after the meal.

3. Deer topped the menu
Venison headlined the meal, although there was a healthy selection of fowl and fish, according to the Pilgrim Hall Museum, which cited writings by Plymouth leaders Edward Winslow and William Bradford. There was a “great store of wild turkeys” to be eaten, as well as ducks and geese, wrote Bradford, who was the governor. Winslow said Massasoit, the leader of the Wampanoag people, contributed five deer to the dinner.

4. It wasn’t called Thanksgiving
There’s no evidence that the 1621 feast was called Thanksgiving, and the event was not repeated for at least a decade, experts say. Still, it is said to be the inspiration behind the now traditional annual gathering and a testament to the cooperation of two groups of people.

5. The peace was short-lived
Early European colonizers and Native Americans lived in peace through a symbiotic relationship for about 10 years until thousands of additional settlers arrived. Up to 25,000 Englishmen landed in the New World between 1630 and 1642, after a plague drastically cut the native population by what’s believed to be more than half. The arrival of new settlers prompted a fight for land and rising animosity. War exploded in 1675, years after Massasoit and Bradford died and power fell to their successors. Many Native Americans have long marked Thanksgiving as a day of somber remembrance.

Click the link below to play a game that explores Wampanoag life prior to European settlement and the year leading up to the 1621 harvest feast, today known as the “First Thanksgiving.” The game investigates the interactions between the Wampanoag people of Patuxet and the earliest colonists known as the Pilgrims by exposing players to archaeological artifacts from the museum’s collections, primary source documents, and oral stories told from generation to generation.

CLICK HERE TO EXPLORE AND PLAY! 

Source: https://time.com/4577425/thanksgiving-2016-true-story/

#90: A Ridiculous Long Way to Find Out the Day of the Week You Were Born

Do you know what day of the week you were born on?  If not, you could…

  1. Ask your parent(s)/guardian(s) if they remember the day of the week.
  2. You could “Google”: What day of the week was May 16, 1975 (that’s my birthday)

OR

You can do this ridiculously long way…which is more fun IMO!

Step 1: Take the last 2 digits of the year in which you were born.

Step 2: Divide that number by 4 and ignore any remainder.

Step 3: Add the day of the month.

Step 4: Add the month’s key value.

  • January and October:Key Value = 1
  • February, March, and November: Key Value = 4
  • April and July: Key Value = 0
  • May: Key Value = 2
  • June: Key Value = 5
  • August: Key Value = 3
  • September and December: Key Value = 6

Step 5: Subtract 1 for January or February of a leap year.

Step 6:

  • Add 0 if the date is in the 1900s
  • Add 6 if the date is in the 2000s
  • Add 4 for the 1700s
  • Add 2 for the 1800s

Step 7:  Add the last 2 digits of the year.

Step 8: Divide by 7 and take the remainder.

  • Remainder 1 is Sunday
  • Remainder 2 is Monday
  • Remainder 3 is Tuesday
  • Remainder 4 is Wednesday
  • Remainder 5 is Thursday
  • Remainder 6 is Friday

Now double-check your work by searching on Google!  Bonus: Create a product that shows your work!  Look below for an example.

#89 Matrices

           

Matrices are rectangular arrangements of rows and columns.

In this mini spark, you will learn about the basics of matrices by watching 2 videos and taking notes.  You can extend your learning by completing the Marvelous Matrices badge!

Step 1: Start by taking out your math notebook.  Put the date at the top and put the title of this mini spark.

Step 2: Watch the 2 videos below and take notes with the new information you learned.

Step 3: Show your notes to your EY Coordinator and/or classroom teacher.