Category Archives: Learning Opportunities

Social Studies Spark #46: A Raindrop’s Journey

You may think every drop of rain falling from the sky, or each glass of water you drink, is brand new, but it has always been here, and is a part of the water cycle.  At its most basic, the water cycle is how water continuously moves from the ground to the atmosphere and back again.  As it moves through this cycle, it changes forms.  Water is the only substance that naturally exists in three states on Earth – solid, liquid, and gas.

Over 96% of total global water is in the ocean, so let’s start there.  Energy from the sun causes water on the surface to evaporate into water vapor – a gas.  This invisible vapor rises into the atmosphere, where the air is colder, and condenses into clouds.  Air currents move these clouds all around the earth.

Water drops form in clouds, and the drops then return to the ocean or land as precipitation, often rainfall.   When it rains, the raindrops fall to the ground, and run off into a lake or river, which flows back into the ocean, where it starts the process again.

Have you ever thought about the journey a raindrop takes?

When you click on the link below, you will see a map of the continental United States.

This website allows for you to click anywhere on the map to drop a raindrop and follow its journey to the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic or the Pacific Oceans! Once you click, you’ll get a bird’s eye view of the path the raindrop takes!

Try it out! Then comment below with something that surprised you!

https://river-runner.samlearner.com/?fbclid=IwAR0W9pISldvvUF9tx6l8RoYLwiz1fITqa1j4aiHTy8htV5bTFIXvkqB45dc

 

Early Enrichment Spark #56: Comedy in Wildlife Photography

Did you know that there are awards for funny photographs of wildlife?

Born from a passion for wildlife, The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards began modestly in 2015 as a photographic competition.

Since then, it has grown into a worldwide competition seen by millions of people every year, and always with wildlife conservation at its heart.

The free competition, open to wildlife photography experts and beginners, celebrates the funniness of our natural world and highlights what we need to do to protect it. From a surprised otter to an angry turtle, Comedy Wildlife’s photographs bring a smile to everyone’s face.

Below is a link to a google slides presentation with some of the finalists for the 2021 Comedy Wildlife Photography awards.

Your job is to write something funny to go along with each photo!

Directions:

Click the link below.                                                                                                                       

Make a copy of the slides.   Now they are yours!                                   

Write something funny on each slide to go along with each picture.                                     

When you are finished, click on the yellow share button.                                                           

Share with the EY teacher at your building!                                                             

Swanson/Sunset: henningsen.jennifer@westside66.net                                         

Westgate/Paddock Rd.: spady.lynn@westside66.net                                                                 

Prairie Lane/Loveland/Westbrook: thompson.megan@westside66.net

Rockbrook/Oakdale/Hillside: sindt.kathleen@westside66.net

Link to Comedy Wildlife Google Slides 

Language Arts Mini Spark #61 – Caption This!

Even if a picture is worth a thousand words, it still needs a caption. Captions are easy to write if you begin with the basics. Let’s practice using the photo below.

Caption:  A caption is text that gives additional information about a picture or illustration.

Example: Begin by brainstorming Who, What, When, Where, and How. Once you have written down these details from the photo, write a caption that gives these details and some additional information (use the checklist below).

Caption Writing Checklist:

  • describe the picture
  • provide additional information
  • written in complete sentences
  • include adjectives and additional details

Now, try one a few on your own!

Teachers: Ask your EY Coordinator for this 65 page resource (PDF), would be great for warms ups and exit tickets to help students practice caption writing!

 

 

#86 Football Roster Math

There is a plethora of data when it comes to sports!  Whether you’re looking at individual player stats, team rankings, or just want to see the breakdown of a particular game…MATH IS EVERYWHERE IN SPORTS!

This Mini Spark has you looking at the 21-22 Westside High School Football JV and Varsity Football Roster.  Download and print a copy of the worksheet and roster by clicking the links below.  Or, you can complete the worksheet digitally using Notability or other app on your iPad.

When you’re finished, show your classroom teacher and/or your EY Coordinator.

Worksheet:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dSSsHG7ddQJjY74xtgz45yVjqlMP8f7y/view?usp=sharing

JV Football Roster:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1tiADGIRu6cgsIQWIx3BTIM1JCS8ICCLZ/view?usp=sharing

Varsity Football Roster: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lf_44eFFhv-QHSsv-M62mpTL4ZX5z61I/view?usp=sharing

image source: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1_UGZ5jFqqjw3iY1GJ_4r-Kt7rpuFOiu3hKX7BYZvWJ8/copy

Language Arts Mini Spark #60- One word sentences

‘Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo’ is a grammatically correct sentence. How? Emma Bryce explains how this and other one-word sentences illustrate some lexical ambiguities that can turn ordinary words and sentences into mazes that mess with our minds. This lesson from TED ED will get you started creating your own ridiculous sentences to share with your friends.

Try figuring out the meaning to these sentences:

Police police Police police police police Police police.
Will, will Will will Will Will’s will?
Rose rose to put rose roes on her rows of roses.
If it is it, it is it; if it is it is it, it is.

If you need help with figuring out the sentences above check out this  guide which will have clues for you.

To wrap up this mini spark, use this info page to find words to help you create your own silly sentence using one word.

#85 Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD)

image taken from https://www.mathsisfun.com/data/mean-deviation.html

Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) is how far, on average, all data values are from the middle.

To find the MAD, you can follow 3 easy steps:

  1. Find the mean of the values
  2. Find the distance of each value from that mean (subtract the mean from each value, ignore minus signs which is also the absolute value)
  3. Then find the mean of those distances

For this Math Mini Spark, you’ll be finding the MAD on a spreadsheet.  Follow the steps below.

Step 1:  Make a Copy of this Spreadsheet by clicking the link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ndcgCZ1EeVcKausxtkmBkONVfCeilbQNE6ukdUCWYk8/copy

Step 2:  Watch the video below and complete the steps shown in the video on your own spreadsheet.

Video: https://youtu.be/nGG2xq1COwE

NOTE:  This mini-spark can be used as 1 spreadsheet lesson for the Spreadsheet Superstar Badge.

Social Studies Spark #45: Map for Time Travelers

                                                                          Source: IFL Science

The Internet has a new favorite interactive map system!

ORBIS, the Stanford geospatial network model of the Roman world, allows you to check how long it would take you to travel from location to location during Roman times.

It’s customizable too! In the unlikely event that you were transported back to 200 BCE and yet somehow the 4G network traveled back in time with you, thanks to these maps you’d be able to calculate how long it would take you to get from Londinium to Corinthus by ox, or Augusta Treverorum to Alexandria as part of a military march.

As well as time, the map, which is of course based on historical evidence, shows you how much each journey would cost.

“Conventional maps that represent this world as it appears from space signally fail to capture the severe environmental constraints that governed the flows of people, goods and information,” Stanford wrote at the time of the release of the first version of ORBIS. “Cost, rather than distance, is the principal determinant of connectivity.”

We thought we’d have a look at how long it would take us to get from Londinium to Ierusalem, to ask them a few questions about what made them eventually change the I in their name to a J.

We gave the parameters that we would be traveling by donkey (as well as boat where necessary) and during the winter. According to Google, if we floored it and didn’t need things like sleep, we could arrive by car in 52 hours, or a much nicer 6-8 hours by plane. But, we know that that the journey would take a lot longer in Roman times:

“The Fastest journey from Londinium to Ierusalem in January takes 53.5 days, covering 5,433 kilometers [3,375 miles]. Prices in denarii, based on the use of a faster sail ship and a civilian river boat (where applicable), and on these road options:

Per kilogram of wheat (by donkey): 22.74
Per kilogram of wheat (by wagon): 27.45
Per passenger in a carriage: 1897.51″

If you were to select the cheapest route, it would take you 98.4 days to complete a 6,129-kilometer (3,303-mile) journey. However, you would save yourself nearly 1,000 denarii per passenger, and 7 denarii per kilogram of wheat. And is it really a holiday if you aren’t shipping a wagonload of wheat back with you as a souvenir?

Check out the map for yourself, it’s pretty cool to play with!

In the comments below, let us know what you discovered!

#84 Doodling in Math Class

What?  Did that say DOODLING?  Yes!

Have fun learning about math while doodling from one of my favorite mathematicians/doodlers…Vi Hart!
Don’t forget to share your doodles with your teacher and/or EY Coordinator.  Maybe you could even organize a math doodle contest for your classroom/school!